autism

It would seem that Jenny McCarthy has been expanding and refining her knowledge base in the field of immunology. After being ardently anti-vaccine for years (and doing who knows how much damage during that time), she now maintains that she is pro-vaccine, but ¦
Top stories: Mammography guidelines questioned, so-called pediatricians jumping on anti-vaccine bandwagon, and the sour news on Vitamin D, again.
Here's a recap of the latest health news stories: The latest and lamest diet soda study, autism awareness up, not rates, and another false dig at phthalates.
A good part of the blame for the appalling lack of scientific knowledge in this country falls squarely on the press. This is something we deal with constantly at ACSH: Headlines that not only don t match the content of the subsequent article, but often contradict it.
We re pretty sure that by now you re at least somewhat familiar with the fraudulent (and supremely damaging) research done (made up, really) by Andrew Wakefield the former physician whose
We at ACSH are sure that you have heard us comment repeatedly that nothing surprises us anymore, because we ve already heard it all. Yet, we must once again eat crow, because we STILL can t get this right. Just when we think (or are maybe even sure) we ve seen it all, it turns out we haven t. Not even close this time.
It has long been known that there is a well-established connection between the age of mothers and complications both for the fetus and the mother. The question of paternal age is less clear. Assumptions that there is no change in sperm quality and birth outcomes have been challenged with mixed results. Some studies have shown little or no correlation between paternal age and birth defects, while others have concluded the opposite.
The frequencies of both induced and augmented labor have increased between 2002 and 2010. In both induced labor artificially stimulated labor and augmented labor increasing the strength, duration or frequency of contractions the woman is administered Pitocin
The link between autism and mercury has once again been debunked. Researchers from the University of Rochester Medical Center conducted a large cohort study involving mothers and children in the Seychelles,