CNN

One of the biggest problems of our hyperpartisan culture is that everything has been turned into a morbid game show. Gone are the days when politicians and the media acted in the best interest of the American people. Instead, we have manufactured controversy and faux outrage over the most mundane of events. Instead of world news, we get 24/7 coverage of the President's Twitter feed. And instead of serious analysis, we get programming that resembles some horrifying merger of Family Feud, Hunger Games, and Real Housewives of New Jersey.
Ever familiar with the puffing of peacock feathers having started my career in neurosurgery before switching fields, watching CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta question Trump's White House physician brought back memories.
Why would the media release personal health information based on so-called sources? If without Romney's consent, then this is quite disturbing and unethical.
CNN's science team must have been in a coma when they swallowed whole a nonsense study about 9/11 dust raising cholesterol in kids. They look pretty foolish, but not nearly as much as the study authors. It will be some time until anyone can "top" this. Don't hold your breath. 
In a recent documentary, the religion scholar ate a small piece of human brains. That was inadvisable. Given the choice of good journalism or sensationalism, Dr. Aslan chose the latter. And from a health standpoint the decision carried risks.
It's a longstanding myth that suicides increase during the holiday season. Regardless, suicide is a major public health threat impacting all ages, careers, genders, and socioeconomic strata at alarming rates – throughout the calendar year.
All arguments are fair game as for whether Dr. Ben Carson is the right (or wrong) person to be Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. But don't tell us a brain surgeon only possesses the skills to be a brain surgeon.