conspiracy theories

In the past few months, Scientific American published an article that attacked biotechnology, another that repeated conspiratorial nonsense about 5G technology, and a third that went on an anti-medical rant aimed at a high-profile gynecologist.
The actor, who played the Hulk in The Avengers movie series, spoke on Capitol Hill on an incredibly important public health topic. What expertise does he have in that area? Well, none. But he is a 9/11 truther who rejects the scientific consensus on GMOs while spreading conspiracy theories about the Zika virus.
Well, it's official. Scientific American, the once-reputable publication, will publish absolutely anything. Just like The Huffington Post or InfoWars.
Have the internet and social media created a climate where Americans believe anything is possible? With headlines citing now as the age of conspiracy, is it really true? In a word, no.
Unless he has a miraculous change of mind and heart, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. will be remembered as a scourge on public health. He'll also be the Kennedy whose words and actions encouraged the spread of not only measles, mumps, and rubella but influenza and cervical cancer as well. What a legacy.
Elvis is still alive. Osama bin Laden is still alive. Paul McCartney is dead. These are just a handful of the conspiracy theories involving the alive/dead status of various famous people. Now, we can add Steve Jobs to the list.
The idea that Lyme disease is due to bioweapons research gone wrong is easily disproven. Our legislators could better spend their time fighting for efforts to prevent disease, instead of investigating a far-fetched story that’s based on misinterpretation and innuendo.
A new, anti-5G "documentary" was created by people who are also "paranormal consultants." That's right, today's real-life Ghostbusters are afraid of iPhones.
Facebook says it jettisoned this screwball for violating its policies, citing the spread of misleading or inaccurate information. But this doesn't fly. Because Adams, who runs the psychotic Natural News website, has been spewing medical and scientific nonsense for many years. The ban wasn't about inaccurate info; Adams just made a crazier-than-usual claim that happened to be more offensive than usual. As for Facebook, it took this get-tough step to save face.
There's simply no way of knowing what anti-vaxxer RFK, Jr. will say on any given day. One day, he's comparing vaccines to the Holocaust. The next, he's helping spread cervical cancer.
The Organic Consumers Association, which promotes conspiracy theories about 9/11, chemtrails, and FEMA, is pushing another one: Pesticides cause school shootings.
People who see corporate shills everywhere they look are no different from run-of-the-mill conspiracy theorists. And some of them are MDs.