CRISPR

The controversy over GMOs lives on, despite the scientific community's best efforts to quell the scaremongering. In order to gather the public's concerns, the FDA is requesting comments on the topic of genome editing, in the production of plants that would be eaten by both humans and animals.
Some scientific discoveries, like human genome editing, challenge our thinking on many levels. And there are many voices getting into the mix of the debate on this subject, taking on the unenviable task of "playing God." 
Researchers at Penn State University have engineered a mushroom that doesn't brown using CRISPR/Cas9, a straightforward, inexpensive and effective technique that can be used to alter the DNA of almost any organism in which it's been tried. This mushroom is just the first in what will be a long list of genetic modifications in organisms (both food and humans) created using this technology.