emergency medicine

Confirmation of a hospital birth just hit the news cycle. When it comes to delivery location, the stakes are too high to add a risk factor or hurdle to childbirth.
Jimmy Carter is reportedly doing well, recovering from surgery for a broken hip sustained after the 94-year-old former president fell at his home. With falls among the top five leading causes of preventable death, context is paramount.
A 50-year-old man’s rare condition caused by a catastrophic stroke leaves him unable to move, speak or perform basic functions like chewing and swallowing. All the while his mind is intact. The diagnosis is called “locked-in syndrome,” and here's a look at this terrifying condition.
Successful organ transplantation requires that a logistically complex series of events take place well beyond the scope of an ideally-matched donor and recipient. As the applications keep expanding, delivery-focused technology is a boon for healthcare.
Penetrating traumas take on a unique trajectory. They can be erratic, asymmetrical and variable in depth and extent. So real estate in the body, and good fortune, matter most.
New research analyzed the rate of foreign-body ingestion in young children, only to determine it increased by over 90% over the study’s 21-year period. Though the items and circumstances vary, no age is spared. And preventable injury is quite costly.
There are many misconceptions about strokes that warrant clarification. They range from those who are at greatest risk to be afflicted to their chances of recovery. Let's take a look.
A recent bus crash reminds us that all episodes of impaired driving are not due to overdose.
Did you know if you had a cardiac arrest, the decision to give you a potentially life-saving medication or placebo – in the fleeting moment where seconds matter – might be made at random by those coordinating a study? A little-known FDA exemption allows for it.
How lucky we are to be alive when, while enduring catastrophic events, the possibility of real-time help is literally at our fingertips.
A man was hospitalized for a heart attack. Insurance paid $55,000 and he was left with a bill of nearly $110,000. Could you, too, have gotten it dropped to less than $800?
When health insurers keep trying to practice medicine without a license, we all lose.