glyphosate

When it comes to food, biotech, and health reporting, the New York Times is at least consistent: It is guaranteed to be wrong every single time.

Recently, it ran a very strange article about traces of glyphosate in Ben & Jerry's ice cream. It's strange for two reasons: (1) Ben & Jerry's is vehemently anti-GMO; and (2) It doesn't matter if there are traces of glyphosate in your ice cream.

Ben & Jerry's Gets 'Greenmailed'

Like Whole Foods, Ben & Jerry's has profited handsomely by scaring people about the safety of the food supply. The company is anti-GMO and supports GMO labeling. However, that...

In Part One, we examined the findings of the 2015 meeting of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), during which a panel of 17 cancer experts considered evidence that would determine what class of carcinogens that glyphosate (the active ingredient in Monsanto's herbicide RoundUp) belonged in.

What was especially strange was that the panel chair was Aaron Blair, an epidemiologist for the National Cancer Institute, was the head of a group which had conducted years of extensive research that gave glyphosate a good safety report card (not expected to be carcinogenic in humans). Yet, the panel never heard anything about Blair's work. He never said a word, allegedly...

Glyphosate, the active herbicide in Roundup, is pretty much always in the news, but it is even more so lately:

  • It causes cancer. (A lawsuit against Monsanto)
  • The EU says it doesn't cause cancer. 
  • It was added to California's Proposition list as a carcinogen. Except it isn't.
  • The...

"Lying" is considered one of those words civilized people should never say. That's why politicians never use it. Instead, their opponents are "misinformed" or "misspeaking" or "using alternative facts." 

Well, the time for civility is over. Journalist -- if we can actually call him that -- Danny Hakim is lying to you. And it's not his first rodeo, either. He's built quite a track record for himself at the New York Times, publishing distorted information about GMOs and comparing agricultural pesticides to "Nazi-made sarin gas." 

Now, Mr. Hakim has written an...

When an article says "Don't let this go unshared," over and over again (five times - if we're counting,) I automatically have questions. When the main message of the article scares people with misinformation and flawed science, then I have an article for Monday morning.

The 'Food Babe' has a new article out on glyphosate that fits both of the descriptions above. She claims that there are new data to show that glyphosate used when crops are grown is making it into many of the foods that are in our cupboards.

She states that a "FDA-registered food safety laboratory tested iconic American food for residues of the weed killer glyphosate (aka Monsanto’s Roundup) and found ALARMING amounts." She then goes on...

There has been a long history of ridiculous fearmongering by environmental activists masquerading as health experts. BPA, MSG, Alar, DDT, and food coloring are just a handful of chemicals that fell prey to overblown fears or outright fabrications. Today, the whipping boy that takes the brunt of the unfounded chemophobic assault on science is the herbicide glyphosate.

Glyphosate is demonized primarily for one reason: Monsanto. To many of its irrational detractors, who refer to the company as "Monsatan," anything the company touches is, by definition, evil. The seed giant genetically engineered some of its crops to be resistant to glyphosate so that farmers could spray it on their fields; the crops would survive while the weeds were destroyed. It's not a perfect solution. For...

BACKWARDSHere's a fact you need to know: California ranks 47th out of 50 states in science education.

I cannot think of any other way to explain the 2+ decades of bungling by a number of counties in wine country in the northern part of the state. It's about plants, and it's mind-boggling. It would seem that the people there seem to want weeds, but not food.

The circus began in 2004 when Mendocino County wrote a law to "prohibit the propagation, cultivation, raising or...

shutterstock_373623073 Nursing Baby via Shutterstock

Although glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide Roundup®, is now recognized by all but a handful of anti-chemical activists to be a non-starter in the cancer-causation races, there is still concern by some that somehow, somewhere, someone will be harmed by it. Since the activists typically target parents of babies and young children, obviously the most easily concerned group, it should be a relief to that group...

Screen Shot 2016-05-03 at 4.35.23 PMGlyphosate does not cause cancer ... if you read about it over the weekend.

That was the conclusion of a report published online by the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday, April 29, 2016, finally shutting down a 30-year debate by giving a definitive answer to a hotly contested topic. But, by Monday, May 2, it was gone.

The report, “Evaluation of the Carcinogenic Potential of Glyphosate," was ...

BigSaladTrue or false: It is a good idea to use a more dangerous chemical to replace a safer one?

Before you answer, take a look at a couple of videos that the folks in Bristol in the UK should have watched before they decided to "go organic" and substitute vinegar (acetic acid plus water) for glyphosate — a supernaturally safe herbicide, which has been used for more than 40 years in the United States.

The first shows what happens when you drop a piece of magnesium metal into vinegar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVHCqbeyA9Q

For a comparison, see what happens...