homeopathy

CVS just sent out a mass email patting itself on the back because the pharmacy chain no longer sells cigarettes. That's fine and good. But here's some of the other junk they sell.
As the rational world continues its descent into madness, the (mis)use of homeopathy seems to be spreading like wildfire. In an attempt to limit antibiotic use in animals, an E.U. group is proposing that homeopathy be used instead. By why stop there? Wouldn't homeopathic grass save a lot of acreage? Or even better, wouldn't a homeopathic cow require neither antibiotics nor grass? Spolier: Stupid alert.
Even the worst imaginable practices by any company in the pharmaceutical the industry pale by comparison to the reprehensible actions of some dietary supplements companies. Those lowlifes are trying to earn a buck from the exploitation of the unfounded vaccination fears of parents. These companies are claiming that their supplements will protect kids from the perils of vaccines. Nonsense and more nonsense.
According to idiotic homeopathy, the more dilute a solution the more powerful it gets. So naturally, it follows that making solutions even *more* dilute -- let's call it "super-homeopathy" -- will make them even stronger. This provides a simple solution for the opioid crisis. But let's be careful. There could be unforeseen consequences (especially from guys with oversized prostate glands).
Ours is a culture that prioritizes instant gratification, and is instinctually reflexive about taking a pill or other fix immediately to end pain. When, actually, it is pain that can in a number of conditions be our greatest gift.
A dearth of truth in medical advertising is probably our greatest public health threat. With consumers bombarded by spurious claims, our agencies need to be proactive, not reactive in protecting the public.  
Complementary medicine ranges from authentic stress-relieving massage to well-meaning (but expensive) placebo, to outright spurious healing claims. Researchers decided to study its impact on patients with curable cancers.
More than a third of kids are using dietary supplements. Due to the many preventable, adverse drug reactions they cause – such as arrhythmias and cardiovascular events – researchers set out to quantify pediatric and adolescent intake.
Who's prescribing homeopathy? A research group sought to learn if there's a difference between medical practices that prescribe homeopathy, and those that don't. What it found was that practices with the worst prescribing quality were more than twice as likely to recommend homeopathy than those who were best.
This year's theme for this nonsense culture is "Homeopathy for Pregnancy and Childbirth." With no shortage of stories where kids have been hurt or killed at homeopathy's hand, it seems wholly appropriate to point out specific instances showing how dangerous this foolish practice really is.
Can you hear Ho, Ho, Ho from the halls of the FDA? We can! They are playing Santa this year, helping to make one of our Christmas wishes come true. That's by bringing the gift of stopping people from getting harmed by homeopathic remedies.                                       
Switzerland brings to mind money, delicious dark chocolate, the Alps and watches. Now we can add homeopathy to the list, because some Swiss doctors (regular MDs, not naturopaths) are prescribing "remedies" to their patients. Some are doing so for the placebo effect, but others actually appear to believe the hype!