IARC

In June, we were besieged with headlines stating that hot drinks cause cancer. It was all due to a letter from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the same letter that overturned its long-standing claim that coffee causes cancer. The bottom line: IARC is confusing. So this holiday season, go ahead and have your coffee -- as hot as you like it.
Jennifer Sass of the NRDC takes issue with the evil empire known as Lumber Liquidators, claiming the company plays Russian Roulette with the health and well-being of our children by selling formaldehyde-spewing laminate flooring. Unfortunately, she cites flawed methodology, delivering only an alarmist rant.
IARC calls glyphosate a carcinogen but actual experts at EFSA disagree. In fact, they actually suggest raising the the acceptable acute reference dose of glyphosate.
Worried about meat and cancer? You don't need to fret International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a part of the World Health Organization, is in the health scare business, as its analysis of coffee shows.
A well-written and illustrative article in the Washington Post explains a great deal about the U.N.'s International Agency for Research on Cancer, and Monsanto's herbicide glyphosate, Roundup. It should be required reading for Americans concerned about the chemical, as well as GMO food. We'll explain.
Another critique of the recent misguided (at best) IARC evaluation of glyphosate agrees with our dissection of the numerous, ideologically-driven failures of science leading to their assessment that the widely-used herbicide is a likely carcinogen, ignoring new data.
This month s meeting in Lyon, France, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) the branch of the UN s World Health Organization that studies the relationship between environmental and lifestyle risk factors and