insects

Crickets have just one short season to reproduce. Can they shed light on a theory of aging, which holds: We use so much energy to reproduce, that we have little left over to stop our decline?
Genetic manipulation can be a force for good, but some voices raise concerns. Not about the unintended consequences, but about their possible, darker uses, as weapons.
One of the worst junk science trends in recent years is for grocery stores and restaurants to claim that they serve "clean food." Obviously, the not-so-subtle message is that everybody else is serving poison, so to be safe, you better eat their food. It's well past time to put aside the snobbish notion that eating clean, local, organic food makes you a superior, healthier human.
Recently, doctors pulled a live, one inch cockroach from a woman's head. EW, right? Turns out, it's not entirely novel for critters to get lodged IN our bodies... They must really like the dwelling! 
It's widely believed that a "bed of nails" surface destroys bacteria through puncturing the cell wall. But new research, based on extensive use of various microscopy techniques, a team of Australian and Nigerian have shown that an entirely different killing mechanism may be at play.
Brown marmorated stink bugs are fond of fruit such as grapes. During winemaking, the critters become stressed (being squashed tends to do that), and the stink bugs live up to their name by producing a compound.  
Outside of the Western world, insect consumption is common. The Chinese, for instance, will eat just about anything that crawls on six (or more) legs. Centipedes and fried scorpions appear on the menu. Not only is entomophagy widespread, it's also probably healthier for people -- and the planet -- than eating other animals.
Fireflies, or lightning bugs, are undoubtedly one of the many joys of summer. Assisting the bugs in this romantic calling are their luminous rear ends, which flash brilliant yellow.