IQ

The media just handed fluoride conspiracy theorists a gift on a giant silver platter: Multiple outlets are reporting that pregnant women who consume too much fluoride produce children with lower IQs. The reports are based on an extremely controversial study just published in JAMA Pediatrics. Are the study's conclusions true? It's doubtful.
It's no secret that air pollution is bad news (but no longer in the U.S.). It's also no secret that people write sensationalized junk that poses as science to drive home a point or support an agenda. Today we're having a two-for-one special. You get both. And no – small particulate matter does not affect IQ. This is beyond ridiculous.
There's no barrier to chess training, so anybody can pick up a book or watch YouTube videos to learn the game. A group of researchers examined people who do and do not play chess, to learn whether innate intelligence is linked to being an effective player. The results were interesting – and a bit controversial.
People who already believe in the benefits of "brain training" may be more likely to participate in a study that is explicitly about the benefits ... of brain training. Obviously, such self-selection will bias the results, and the placebo effect can magnify them.
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends mothers breastfeed their babies exclusively for up to six months and then a combination of solid foods
Here is ACSH's official list of this year's top 10 scares