mortality

Is there a magical prescription for how much exercise and activity eliminates the increased risk of premature death, which comes from sedentary behavior? A new paper takes a swing at an elusive target. Spoiler alert: This is an area that continues to defy precision.
The systematic erosion of continuity of care has financial and personal health costs. This is well-known, especially to health professionals, and it's supported by overwhelming evidence. And yet, it persists.
Could it be that where we go to medical school makes us better, or worse, physicians? Or rather, is the old joke true? "Q: What do you call the student graduating at the bottom of their medical school class? A: Doctor."
It is officially July! In the medical world that means fresh graduates become interns or fellows or attendings. Along with such promotions comes high turnover departures and the refrain "don’t get sick in July." But, does this annual transition actually make patients more vulnerable to adverse events?
Couch potatoes pay attention — you don't have to run miles each day to benefit your health. Indeed, recent research indicates that moderate levels of activity can significantly lower mortality risks.
Want to decrease your risk of death? Try eating hot red chiles — or so you might think based on a recent research paper. In all, the data aren't terribly convincing. It seems that relaxing to some music would provide as much of a benefit as this study seems to show.
A new, disturbing report, based on data collected from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, shows an increase in the death rates for young Americans over a 15-year period. This has been driven substantially by a shocking increase in the mortality of white women aged 25 to 35.
Are you shocked by this news in the headline? Us here, not so much. But hats off to the Harvard research team for its new approach to tackling gender inequality in medicine. And the researchers did it by getting back to basics: Let the evidence speak for itself. And to a certain extent, it does.
Are the very real physical costs of your outrage worth it? Albeit the election, contentious divorce or nonstop negativity, there are tangible prices to our responses to these and other types of triggers.
The Japanese population is known for living long lives — and a new study suggests that adherence to that culture's version of dietary guidelines is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality. In addition, balanced consumption of all foods seems to be associated with greater longevity.
Although we know that obesity is associated with an increased risk of numerous ills, it hasn't been clear that it's also linked to an increased risk of death. A new study suggests that the way the BMI data has been examined may account for that dissonance, and that body weight history may also weigh in on mortality risk.
The "Cancer Statistics" report from the American Cancer Society confirms the continued decline in cancer deaths in America. Since peaking in 1991, the death rate has dropped by 23 percent, translating to more than 1.7 million deaths averted through 2012.