norovirus

It's only early December, but already there's been some nasty norovirus outbreaks in the U.S. One was bad enough to close an entire school. Another hit 400 people at the U.S. Air Force Academy. In response, some bits of wisdom (and humor) about this dreaded stomach bug.
Vaxart, a biopharmaceutical company, is working on a vaccine for the dreaded norovirus. The company just released its Phase Ib results. Did it work? Our lips are sealed. But here are some thoughts on its chances for success.
A group from University of Arizona's College of Biomedical Engineering has figured out how to turn a smartphone into an analytical instrument. It's capable of measuring an insanely small quantity of norovirus – the bug the causes viral gastroenteritis. Water samples can now be checked for viral contamination. Very clever, indeed.
Scientists from two universities and the National Institutes of Health are developing a vaccine to defeat norovirus' defense mechanism: mutation. By targeting a "conserved region" -- the part of the viral capsid that does not mutate -- they have discovered an antibody that may cover most strains that circulate now, as well as those that might circulate in the future.
Vaxart Inc., a San Francisco based vaccine biotech, just announced that it will begin dosing subjects in a Phase 1b study company's bivalent oral experimental vaccines against norovirus -- the cause of the so-called "stomach flu." Everyone should wish them well.
Just like every winter, norovirus is going around like crazy. Some of you will get it and some of you won't. Is it simply luck, or is there something more going on? Yes, there is. If you have the "right" blood type you will probably be spared. But if you have the "wrong" type you may be hugging the bowl.
Winter is on the way and the hideous norovirus (stomach virus) always comes along for the ride. Are we still helpless against this little monster? What's going on out there? You may be surprised.
Norovirus, otherwise known as the "stomach flu," hit the campus of Western Connecticut State University hard last week. The number of students who were walloped by the illness was so high the campus shut down for an entire day. So instead of the more-routine cancellation for a snow day, the campus had a stomach flu day. 
A case of the "stomach flu" is bad enough, so the last thing we need is our own immune system making it worse. But that's just what can happen, courtesy of an obscure component in the intestinal lining called tuft cells. These little devils help us fight off parasites. But they also give norovirus a place to replicate and a reservoir in which to reside.
The Winter Olympic Games are set to begin this week, but, the organizers have been thrown a last minute headache - well more of a stomachache, actually. Dozens of members of the security detail in the Olympic facilities have come down with norovirus or "the stomach flu." This is making for a nail-biter of a finish - waiting to see if any of the athletes are affected - and the competition hasn't even started yet!
With winter approaching, perhaps you or somebody you know will be unlucky enough to catch a nasty "stomach flu" or "24-hour flu," (which will produce some quality time in the bathroom). Now while you will almost certainly feel better within 24-72 hours, here's the catch: There's no such thing as the stomach or 24-hour flu.
Viruses are all over the news right now. Here's one that is really bad news norovirus. What's it going to do to you? How do you catch it? NBA Hall-of-Famer and wicked wordsmith Walt Frazier explains. Take it away Clyde.