obstetrics

With childbirth, the stakes are too high to add a risk factor or another hurdle. A healthy mom and healthy baby should be the goal of any delivery.
The adverse effects on patient safety from poor hospital scheduling and staffing are well known. This occurs when there's a shortage of experienced physicians and health professionals at work during non-standard hours. Maternal health is the latest focus.
Though Hollywood features can be quite dramatic, the real thing can provide much more entertainment.
With women opting for "free birth" or "unassisted birth" the stakes are only getting higher. Dismissing medical advice is also taking the form of a misguided practice of prolonging delivery well beyond due dates.
For some expectant mothers, there's a strong desire to have less "medicalization" of labor and delivery. It manifests itself in home births and water births for those adamantly opposed to a hospital setting. Now, “unassisted birth” goes a step further excluding a trained professional from the delivery. It's time to clarify the risks.
With continued refrains of "too many" or "too few" being applied to manners of birth, which often serve to shame or assign blame, the focus is on the wrong issue. A new study on delivery mode helps inform us on this topic.
A baby was born from a living donor's transplanted uterus. Following in the footsteps of Swedish success in this area, this achievement provides significant hope for those with uterine factor infertility, or UFI.
Another underwater birth, another near-fatal consequence. This time the imperiled, septic newborn endured unnecessary multi-organ failure, which necessitated a two-month hospitalization in intensive care.
After the World Health Organization and United Nations Children's Fund doubled down – urging breastfeeding at all costs, despite no country meeting their standards – we need to ask: Has the U.K.'s latest reversal of the normal birth campaign taught us anything? Value-laden ideology should not drive health policy.
A new study published in the journal Pediatrics concludes that an early, scheduled delivery is linked to poor childhood development at school age. When and how a baby is born requires assessing a multitude of influencing factors. Educating the masses on the risks and benefits of planned birth for non-medical reasons is very important in making a truly informed decision.
Survey says: the overwhelming majority of Ob-Gyns don t discuss toxic chemicals with moms-to-be. The activists spin: Most Ob docs are not up on these risks. Really? Maybe not as up as EWG!