pediatrics

Now, Disney Princesses and films are under attack. We are straying further and further away from what most impacts child development as a source of adult challenges.
With continued refrains of "too many" or "too few" being applied to manners of birth, which often serve to shame or assign blame, the focus is on the wrong issue. A new study on delivery mode helps inform us on this topic.
When what's absent in a story carries equal or more weight than what is actually reported, the damage goes beyond ratings. It undermines public health.
Just because something is documented in a medical chart doesn't make it more accurate. How it's conveyed, and in what context, greatly matters.
Rushing through the seemingly mundane aspects of childhood might not be playing the long game.
It's time to recognize and champion the invaluable, grueling work of neonatal nurses.
Many well-intended efforts that fixate on bias can achieve the unintended consequence of imposing it instead.
It's normal for a baby to be difficult to get to sleep, which is clearly exhausting for new parents. Bu, expensive "sleep consultants" aren't the answer.
A dearth of truth in medical advertising is probably our greatest public health threat. With consumers bombarded by spurious claims, our agencies need to be proactive, not reactive in protecting the public.  
When the American Academy of Pediatrics has to issue a report for pediatricians to write a "prescription for play" at every well-visit, our culture is in crisis.
With the release of the CDC's 2018 breastfeeding scorecard, it is time to add common sense into these failed policies that actually supports women and families.
Armadillo reproduction can teach us a rather wise guiding principle.