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In the mid-19th century, traveling medicine shows became all the rage. They were basically like small circuses that also peddled phony medicine. Today, we may laugh at how gullible we once were. But charlatans like Dr. Oz are the modern-day equivalent of that traveling con job.
Dr. Oz is what would happen if Alex Jones and Mother Jones had a baby. And perhaps short of murdering somebody on live TV, there is literally nothing Dr. Oz won't say or do for money.
The Food and Drug Administration recently issued draft guidelines for the regulation of stem cell therapy clinics. They have become part of a booming industry, with many of them run by those with the ethical makeup of snake oil salesmen of yesteryear.
After six years on the air, Dr. Oz says he s making some changes to his popular TV show, viewed daily by millions. Following the media firestorm from that letter from physicians across the country, Oz has now admitted publicly he was wrong to endorse so many miracle weight loss pills. Most recently, he announced the addition of Dr. Michael Crupain to his staff. His duties would include (according to the press release) being
Dr. Oz is at it again, and millions of viewers are watching and listening to what he has to say. His latest scam is a pill that he claims will lead to the loss of 25 pounds of fat in one month. And