tobacco

A discussion in Rolling Stone magazine of vaping, and the hysteria and fearmongering about it, is a breath of fresh air.
A recent CDC survey of adult behaviors found that more recent quitters, and those who have tried to quit, are using e-cigarettes.
A new Reuters survey confirms what those interested and involved in smoking and tobacco-related issues have observed: more and more Americans are using e-cigarettes and vapor products (vaping), to quit or reduce their consumption of deadly cigarettes.
Instead of the WHO s World No Tobacco Day, we d be better off with a new event: World No Tobacco Control Day
The long and winding road which led to 2009 s Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA, or TCA), which bestowed regulatory authority over tobacco products to the FDA, had many bizarre twists
Dr. Brad Rodu is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Louisville. He has been an ACSH advisor for many years, and has written or co-written many of our publications on tobacco harm reduction. He was also a member of the ACSH Panel at the American Academy for the Advancement of Science
The American College of Physicians, the governing body for internists across America, issued a position statement calling for strict regulation of e-cigarettes, including bans on flavors and advertising.
Conflict of interest at the FDA, Part Deux: The tobacco advisory panel, well-stocked with ideologically devoted anti-harm reduction membership, could not determine that snus is less harmful than smoking. Shame!
Greg Gutfeld on FoxNews The Five: California politicians are spending the taxpayer s money to fight e-cigs, an effective anti-smoking device. He points out the absurdity of the CA crusade, advises, It s not about health: follow the money.
Dr. Gilbert Ross in the New Haven Register, March 12, 2015 On the subject of public health, the Connecticut legislature is off to a very bad start. New measures have been introduced in both the Houses that would severely interfere with smokers ability to quit their deadly habit. Passing laws that re-define common words, such as tobacco and smoke, is a slippery slope. Using that subterfuge to torpedo a succ