tobacco

It s true, sad to say: By the time the truth awakens and puts its boots on, the lie has spread around the world. Such it is with the JAMA article by Dr. Stanton Glantz and his media acolytes with one exception.
NY Times article on the future of e-cigarettes paints a Good vs. Evil scenario. Unfortunately, there is little guidance therein to detect who is whom. Those of us devoted to science-based public health policy know, however: find out here.
In her Personal Health column in the New York Times, Jane Brody tackles perhaps the greatest problem facing public health professionals today how to get smokers to quit, or prevent non-smokers from ever starting.
A new Perspective article in the New England Journal of Medicine almost allows for the likely benefits of electronic cigarettes as part of a harm reduction approach to reducing the deadly toll of smoking. At last some science-based progress!
A new Surgeon-General s report, The Health Consequences of Smoking 50 Years of Progress, attempts to update the status of smoking and health in America. In fact, not much new is found in this lengthy report, and the explanation for why this is lies in the introductory blurbs preceding it.
The effects of nicotine on human health - Consumer version  
Following-up on their op-ed in the NYTimes last week, Drs. Amy Fairchild and colleagues published a Perspective in the New England Journal of Medicine, calling for a valid, science-based approach to e-cigarettes, and noting the vast potential benefits from these devices.
At a boisterous NYC Council hearing on e-cigarettes, ACSH got our points across, spearheading a science-based retort to the NYC Health Commissioner s spurious assertions about chemicals in the vapor, and how hard it is to tell smoking from vaping.
Safe and effective in helping smokers quit, concerns about e-cigarettes provoke efforts to suppress their use in public by New York City. Can the City leaders not tell the difference between a cigarette, and an e-cigarette? It s not that hard.
A new study, reported at a cancer research meeting, shows that the "problem" of teens becoming addicted to nicotine via e-cigarettes is another in a long line of hypothetical, or phony, scares promoted by our public health authorities afraid of anything that resembles a cigarette.
The NYC Council passed a measure raising the age to purchase tobacco products to 21, highest in the nation. Thankfully, no restrictions on e-cigarettes nor the nicotine liquids many vapers prefer were included except for the age limit change. ACSH supports this change, although we don't believe it will prevent most under-21s from getting smokes if they want to.