USDA

Food labels serve one purpose, and one purpose only: To provide nutritional information to consumers. The process by which a food is produced is not relevant to its nutritional content or safety profile. Therefore, products made using animal cell culture techniques absolutely should not require special labeling.
Question: Does the deletion a gene make an organism genetically modified? Answer: Not if the organism is a plant – only if it's an animal. The contradictions of that definition are now a subject of congressional concern.
The Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program. or SNAP, has successfully addressed food security – but it hasn't helped improve the diets of at-risk consumers. But now, the availability of online sales provides an opportunity where data and consumer feedback can be used to improve food choices for those facing significant health problems.
Researchers at Penn State University have engineered a mushroom that doesn't brown using CRISPR/Cas9, a straightforward, inexpensive and effective technique that can be used to alter the DNA of almost any organism in which it's been tried. This mushroom is just the first in what will be a long list of genetic modifications in organisms (both food and humans) created using this technology.
ACSH S Dr. Gil Ross was quoted in the Washington Examiner yesterday in an article dealing with a House committee member s concerns about the FDA and the USDA s approach to handling evaluations and reporting on pesticide residues on food. His opinion differed from a rep. from the Pesticide Action Network, as you would imagine.
In an encouraging new study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week, schools across
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it will make fundamental revision to its proposed national standards for organic foods. Its backtracking is in response to thousands of written comments that indicated dissatisfaction on the part of organic adherents. Proponents objected to the fact that the proposed rule did not, for example, forbid the use of either genetically engineered products or food irradiation. The new rule will, presumably, disallow these processes. USDA will thus ignore the scientific evidence that such processes are safe, and instead enforce a belief system promoted by many with near religious fervor rather than focus on food safety and wholesomeness.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it will make fundamental revision to its proposed national standards for organic foods. Its backtracking is in response to thousands of written comments that indicated dissatisfaction on the part of organic adherents. Proponents objected to the fact that the proposed rule did not, for example, forbid the use of either genetically engineered products or food irradiation. The new rule will, presumably, disallow these processes. USDA will thus ignore the scientific evidence that such processes are safe, and instead enforce a belief system promoted by many with near religious fervor rather than focus on food safety and wholesomeness.