vaccinations

Well-known vaccine skeptic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. attended the Sacramento screening of anti-vaccine documentary Trace Amounts on Tuesday and gave a speech to the audience, and as expected, it was filled with dangerous and unscientific misinformation. In light of the upcoming hearing for California Senate Bill
Yesterday, Womenshealth.gov, the official website of the Office on Women s Health of the US Department of Health and Human Services published the story of Michelle Whitlock, who was diagnosed with cervical cancer a month
In 2014, there were almost 600 cases of measles in the United States from January 1st to August 29th the highest number of cases in the past two decades. In a perspective piece published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Walter Orenstein, MD, and Katherine Seib,
A recent judge ruling protects the public health of its local community by prohibiting unvaccinated students from attending school when another
Giving a combination vaccine, MMR-V (MMR plus varicella-chickenpox) vaccines at one time as opposed to separately, increases the risk of febrile seizures in infants. But the absolute risk is extremely low either way, much lower than the risk of measles, and such seizures have no significant sequelae.
2014 Will be remembered for a number of things: The Seahawks destroying the Broncos in the Super Bowl, Derek
The Amish typically have very low vaccination rates for three reasons: First, in their culture, they have not been exposed to the overall benefits of children s vaccinations; second, they believe that vaccines may put their
As, the dark cloud that hovered over vaccines mostly from damage done by fraudster Andrew Wakefield slowly lifts, the last thing we need is to have actual doctors jumping back on the anti-vaccine bandwagon. Yet, the always (oops, make that never) reliable Mother Jones (March 30th) somehow managed to dig up a group of pediatricians from California (big surprise) who are not quite following the recommended CDC vaccination schedules.
Public health educators may believe that rationally advising parents about the facts of vaccine safety will lead them to abandon their fears of side-effects. However, a new survey study seems to show that, while a battle may be won, the war is lost.
A beneficial trend in vaccine exemptions seems to be spreading, even to regions and states with entrenched anti-vaccine fears. Who knows if this continues, recurrent epidemics of preventable illnesses may become a thing of the past.
Flu vaccine still under-utilized, safe, and somewhat effective. CDC estimates millions of serious illnesses have been averted by the shot (and thousands of deaths). Pregnant women remain fearful, but they and their newborns pay the price if their physicians are negligent in not urging them to get vaccinated.
It was a bad idea last month; why publish it again? Mandating flu vaccine for healthcare workers is a no-brainer, the arguments against it are specious. So why did JAMA re-publish the article endorsing masks instead? They protect no one except fearful workers from imaginary dangers, while exposing patients to contagion.