vaccine

What happens to the global economy if the medicine ends up harming those it is meant to cure?
Vladimir Putin and the Kremlin's propaganda machine are working in overdrive.
Somewhere along the way, our achievable goal of "flattening the curve" for COVID-19 has mutated into "finding a cure," which is perhaps an impossible one. Public health and economic policy must be based on reality, not starry-eyed wish-making. Otherwise, people's lives and livelihoods are in grave danger.
A lot of time in MBA school is spent on defining and discussing corporate social responsibility (CSR), giving back to the community, local or global. The recent concerns about the Wuhan Coronavirus, now re-labeled Covid-19, like the concern about Zika, Ebola, and SARS has lead to frantic calls to Big Pharma to provide a vaccine. Sanofi Pasteur has now partnered with our US Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, BARDA, a part of Health and Human Services, to develop a vaccine. But that decision was also accompanied by other members of Big Pharma saying that they were not pursuing a vaccine. Do these large corporations have a broader social responsibility to create these vaccines?
Vaxart Inc., a San Francisco based vaccine biotech, just announced that it will begin dosing subjects in a Phase 1b study company's bivalent oral experimental vaccines against norovirus -- the cause of the so-called "stomach flu." Everyone should wish them well.
Do you want grandma to keep baking cookies? Well, she won't anymore if she dies from the flu. So go get your shot when the next flu season rolls around in October.
Due to rampant false claims, could moratoriums on medical searches by social media companies actually free up time in an office visit. And also, lessen health care burdens?
Seven years ago, the global public health community declared the eradication of rinderpest, a severe viral disease of cattle. But today, Bulgaria says it's dealing with an outbreak of ovine rinderpest. They are two different, but closely related, viruses. Here's some insight into what we know.
We're possibly getting closer to saving thousands of newborns from a potentially nasty illness, and death. Novavax, a clinical-stage biotechnology company, states that it's reached a milestone in a clinical trial for the highly-anticipated vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV.
Vical continues to push its VCL-HB01  herpes vaccine through development. Larry Smith, Ph.D., the senior VP of Research, answers some questions about where things stand now and what to expect in the near future. 
In spite of anti-vaccine efforts to scare parents, recent CDC data indicates that the overwhelming majority of children entering kindergarten are being appropriately immunized. Using data from 48 states and the District of Columbia, researchers found that a median of over 90 percent of kids are receiving the recommended vaccines.
An amazing new technology that uses silk to deliver vaccines just got a nice boost – to the tune of $6M – from Bill and Melinda Gates. Maybe with novel approaches like this, we'll finally see polio eradicated once and for all.