Wakefield

Although his reports on the spurious connections between vaccines and autism have been roundly refuted and his "research" report retracted, Andrew Wakefield's poison continues to harm children. In Minnesota, the continuing outbreak of measles in a Somali community is the latest case in point.
In a piece dripping with sardonic disgust, Toronto Globe and Mail columnist Tabatha Southey took on the new curriculum at the august University of Toronto recently. Entitled Anti-vaccine course brings U of T one step closer to offering a masters of pseudoscience, Ms. Southey takes note of the recently-released official report of the approval of a course called Alternative Health: Practice and Theory, to be taught (so to speak) by the well-known homeopath Beth Landau-Halpern.
There seems to be new excitement in the world of vaccine-autism conspirators. As explained in a masterful debunking essay by David Gorski on Science-Based Medicine, the Internet abounds with new evidence that the CDC purposefully hid evidence of a link between the MMR vaccine and an increased risk of autism in African-American boys.
2014 Will be remembered for a number of things: The Seahawks destroying the Broncos in the Super Bowl, Derek
We re pretty sure that by now you re at least somewhat familiar with the fraudulent (and supremely damaging) research done (made up, really) by Andrew Wakefield the former physician whose
We at ACSH are happy to give a shout-out to Sheila M. Eldred, whose August op-ed on Discovery.com reflects what we have been screaming for years that the failure to have children vaccinated is a terrible mistake that is caused by a number of factors.