Nutrition and Lifestyle

Among the latest fads are specialty salts, which are sold as if they are magic potions by the same people who are always selling magic potions. Sea salt is one of them. The real of the product should be "Throw Sea Salt and Money Over Your Shoulder."
We already offer pre-natal maternal vitamins. Should we offer pre-natal paternal ones? A study looks at the transmission of "health" from father to sons, making use of data from the U.S. Civil War and providing interesting support for sperm's acquisition of epigenetic information. Who knew they were so busy?
The U.S. will soon have to change its clock again. It's a useless junk-science, government policy that has lasted 52 years too long. Here are the admittedly minor health effect risks. It's still annoying.
The FDA just announced that it is no longer allowing seven chemicals to be used as artificial flavors in foods because of cancer concerns. Sounds reasonable, no? NO- it's not. The agency is allowing the same seven chemicals to be used as long as they are derived from natural sources, not synthetic - something that an Organic 101 student knows is a meaningless distinction because there is no difference. Let's give them an F in chemistry.
The CDC has gathered six years of data on which bugs cause food poisoning. Norovirus infections lead the pack by a wide margin, but not for deaths and hospitalizations. Read about some other bad boys out there that you do not want to get. And if you act now, you'll enjoy a guest appearance by Game of Thrones characters!
In the first federal study focusing on fast-food consumption, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 37 percent of American adults reported eating fast food within 24 hours of being asked. Nationwide, that translates to roughly 85 million adults visiting these establishments daily.
What physical risks do you run during a race of this length? Since high-mileage training can drain the body of vital nutrients, the short answer is: quite a few. Here's some insight into this punishing endeavor.
Marketing executives at General Mills insisted that if their personal Twitter feeds were evidence, people were in a panic about GMOs. Then they discovered the awful truth.
Superhyped: superfoods. The concept is ridiculous, yet wealthy Americans are buying into it big time. Depending on how you define them, superfoods either don't exist at all – or we're surrounded by them. One ACSH advisor, the Director of Medical Nutrition at Columbia University Medical Center, weighs in.
Here's an example of how a kernel of insight from a study evolves into a news item, which can then become a health concept that people can unwittingly incorporate into their personal exercise routines. And all for no good reason.
Some people have unfounded fears of food preservatives. After all, they do have chemical names that sound scary. Who would want sodium benzoate, when they could have flavonoids do the same job? Even the name itself is relaxing.
Contrary to popular belief, Diet Coke does not contain zero calories. It doesn't have much; it's the same as about 0.9% of an M&M. But the chemical structure of aspartame, the cola's artificial sweetener, shows us why there are any calories at all.