allergies

The flu may be almost over, but another pesky season is just around the corner: allergy season. It affects up to 60 million people in the U.S. each year, and it's easy to mistake for the common cold. How can you tell them apart?
Over-the-top responses to peanuts are not uncommon. People are under the impression that the mere whiff of a peanut is enough to send some kids to the emergency room. But that's simply not true.
Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer. B-cells, immune cells that play a crucial role in adaptive immunity, differentiate into plasma cells that secrete the antibodies we need to fight infections and other foreign invaders.
Happy Spring! Cue the sniffles, scratchy throats, and sinus headaches. Experts warn that this year's pollen count is high, but how do they actually measure it? We discuss how it's done, while offering a few tips on how to reduce your exposure to airborne irritants.
An op-ed by family medicine practitioner Victoria Dooley, MD, in today s New York Times discusses the problems engendered when people who say they are allergic to certain antibiotics actually aren t and why this is a deadly problem.
The mysterious world of allergies got a little stranger yesterday as a new study concluded that nut allergies in children can be greatly reduced if their mothers (if they are themselves not allergic to nuts) eat tree nuts and peanuts while they are pregnant.
If spring evokes thoughts of tissues rather than love because of allergies, there may be some new treatments on the horizon.