Andrew Kolodny

Andrew Kolodny's lack of knowledge of pharmacology is legendary. His chemistry must be far worse. Should I be flattered when he appears to be copying mine? "Imitation is the best form of flattery." Charles Caleb Colton, 1824 ... "Except when it makes me want to puke." Josh Bloom, 2019
Oklahoma now has 572 million extra dollars, thanks to a judge's ruling that Johnson & Johnson was partly responsible for the so-called opioid crisis. Other states will follow and J&J will cough up a bunch of money, regardless of whether the company did anything wrong or not. Other companies will be hit as well. Meanwhile, ponder these questions: Why would any company sell opioids from now on? And what will this mean for you?
The state of Oklahoma is smelling blood in the water -- and it's going after blood money. State Attorney General Mike Hunter has a very big "blood donor" in his sights: Johnson & Johnson. The expert witness for the state is (of course) Andrew Kolodny. Is Kolodny qualified? These 8 questions should be posed to him.
A Pew Research Center article, "Rapid Opioid Cutoff Is Risky Too, Feds Warn" takes an honest look at the suffering created by the radical, misguided anti-opioid jihad. It's a shame that its author, Christine Vestal, also included quotes from Andrew Kolodny, who denies the mess that he and his friends made while claiming that very few patients were "inappropriately tapered." Like herpes infection, Kolodny never goes away.
Dr. Kolodny (1) has a long history of spreading misinformation about the opioid crisis; (2) insults chronic pain patients; (3) profits handsomely from doing so; and (4) calls everyone who disagrees with him an industry shill. The good doctor's version of compassion actually comes with poor bedside manner and a hefty price tag.
The self-proclaimed expert on opioids and addiction "agreed" to sit down with me and answer some tough questions about his background, medical insight and plans for the future. (Keep in mind that this "interview" took place on April 1.)
Kolodny, the self-appointed (but thoroughly unqualified) opioid czar, repeatedly uses the made-up phrase "heroin pills." It's an apparent attempt to demonize opioids like oxycodone. In a way, he's succeeded. To fill the void left by the oxycodone shortage, the Southwestern U.S. is being flooded by "real" heroin pills called "Mexican Oxy." But the pills aren't actually heroin; they're fentanyl copies of oxycodone, which kill when consumed. Nice going, once again.