anti vaccine

All parents of infants, toddlers and young children should be required to read an essay in the Huffington Post by
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t s been a rough month for Jenny McCarthy. Following her backpedaling op-ed in the April 12th Chicago Sun-Times she has taken considerable heat for stating that she has never been anti-vaccine, as well as suggesting an alternative vaccination schedule based on her feelings. We at ACSH approached this from a different angle in a Dispatch item last week, where we asked why should anyone care in the least what a former model has to say about immunology.
It would seem that Jenny McCarthy has been expanding and refining her knowledge base in the field of immunology. After being ardently anti-vaccine for years (and doing who knows how much damage during that time), she now maintains that she is pro-vaccine, but ¦
Top stories: Mammography guidelines questioned, so-called pediatricians jumping on anti-vaccine bandwagon, and the sour news on Vitamin D, again.
As, the dark cloud that hovered over vaccines mostly from damage done by fraudster Andrew Wakefield slowly lifts, the last thing we need is to have actual doctors jumping back on the anti-vaccine bandwagon. Yet, the always (oops, make that never) reliable Mother Jones (March 30th) somehow managed to dig up a group of pediatricians from California (big surprise) who are not quite following the recommended CDC vaccination schedules.
We at ACSH give a huge shoutout to Dr. Kristen Feemster, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the Children s Hospital of Philadelphia, and colleague of ACSH trustee Dr. Paul Offit. In her recent op-ed in The New York Times, Dr. Feemster argues that there should be no exemptions from vaccinations for personal or religious reasons.
The anti-vaccine crowd perhaps a little discouraged after the complete and thorough debunking of any link between vaccination and autism will probably scream bloody murder. Except, (as always) it will be about nothing. Or in this case, almost nothing.
It s nice to know that there are others out there who are presenting ACSH s opinion
A very large retrospective analysis performed by researchers affiliated with Kaiser-Permanente Northern California (KPNC) has confirmed what numerous prior studies have shown: there is no discernible link between influenza vaccine and the neurological condition, Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS).