anti-vaxxers

Measles, which still kills about 90,000 people around the world every year, isn't the only microbe making a comeback. Rotavirus could too, a bug that causes diarrhea and kills around 200,000 children under the age of five.

The CDC immunization schedule recommends that babies receive their first dose of rotavirus vaccine at the age of two months. However, only about 73% of American children have completed all doses. Once again, we are flirting with a preventable disaster....

It's a shocking number. Last year, nearly 90,000 people around the world died from measles. This is the same disease that anti-vaxxers mocked as "Mickey Mouse measles" following the Disneyland outbreak, implying that the viral infection isn't serious.

But it is serious. Deadly serious. As recently as the year 2000, more than 500,000 people died from measles every single year. The reason for the dramatic decrease in deaths is because of a concerted global effort to eradicate the virus through vaccination. And it is clearly paying off.

To demonstrate the benefit of vaccination, the CDC calculated the number of deaths that are still occurring worldwide due to measles and the number of deaths that would have occurred had there been no global eradication program from 2000 to...

Since writing about the increasing numbers of vaccinations earlier this month, it has been easy to feel like the score is tipping in public health's direction. More vaccinations mean fewer people are getting preventable diseases - and that is something that we at ACSH can celebrate. 

However, this is not the time to get complacent about the controversies surrounding vaccination. 2016 was a year filled with the fervor of the anti-vaxxer movement and their zeal for stopping this public health measure from saving the lives of their children looks like it is ramping up as we head into 2017. 

This year saw the release of Andrew Wakefield's movie VAXXED (thankfully...

When a measles outbreak occurred at Disneyland roughly two years ago, anti-vaccine activists mocked it. They derided the infectious disease, caused by perhaps the most contagious human virus known, as "Mickey Mouse measles." Many claimed that measles is no big deal. As proof, they cited memories of getting measles as a child and recovering.

If only every person was so lucky. The World Health Organization estimates that, in 2015, there were 134,200 deaths caused by measles, or 367 deaths every single day. In 1980, a staggering 2.6 million people died from measles. That is why measles really is a big deal; it's a highly infectious virus that is potentially deadly. And it is why global public health...

When I was a child, getting chickenpox was a rite of passage. Everyone had to get it, sooner or later, and sooner was preferable. The day I noticed in 2nd grade the itchy little bumps forming, I celebrated because I knew that it meant several days away from school. 

Of course, after just a day or two of itchiness, I learned that chickenpox wasn't all that fun. Then, when I turned 30, I suffered an outbreak of shingles, which was incredibly unpleasant. It was then that I wished the chickenpox vaccine had existed when I was a tot. And because the virus that causes chickenpox is a type of herpesvirus, it will live inside me forever, meaning that I could have an outbreak of...

The American Council on Science and Health has just launched a new page on Pinterest. (Please follow us!) As part of our mission to serve as trusted guides on complex science and health issues, we felt that it was imperative for us to have a visible and active presence on one of the world's most popular social media sites.

And wow, do we have our work cut out for us.

After just a few minutes on Pinterest, it was crystal clear that the site served as a gigantic sewer pipe for the worst sort of anti-science propaganda and paranoia that the Internet can vomit up.

Take vaccines, for instance. When I searched for "vaccines," these were the top five posts:

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Credit: Belle News Credit: Belle News

Robert De Niro forced to pretend to accept science

Despite claims that it was critical to "openly" discuss all of the issues in autism, the actor Robert De Niro wisely pulled the film "Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe" from next month's Tribeca Film Festival, which claimed autism was caused by vaccines, despite every reputable scientist in the world knowing otherwise....

Vaccines via shutterstock Vaccines via shutterstock

Perhaps it’s because many of us old enough to make decisions regarding immunizations for our children are also too young to remember what it was like to live through the days of measles, diphtheria or whooping cough, that we make stupid decisions.

Recently, the United States has seen waves of outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. A recent JAMA study sought to provide concrete epidemiological evidence for how...

courtesy razorgator.com courtesy razorgator.com

Oh no not the NFL too!

Business mogul and Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump has fearlessly or outrageously, depending on your politics taken on a number of issues that conceivably could have doomed his campaign. Thus far, however, such seemingly-bizarre stances have apparently had the opposite effect: his out-of-the-box positions have only enhanced his poll numbers. Trump has referred to Mexicans as thieves and rapists, tarred all Muslims as terrorists, and demeaned and intimidated women of all ages and occupations. But has...

Market research is a tough business, in particular because it operates on an often faulty assumption that we can identify what humans want by lumping them into homogeneous categories. Sometimes this is easy enough: By now it is safe to believe that Bostonians are interested in baseball, construction workers like pickup trucks and that female millennials like cats.

And it is safe to believe that anti-vaxxers must be the kind of people who shop at Whole Foods and care about recycling, as evidenced by a recent ad campaign from the Immunisation Alliance WA (Western Australia) 1.

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