antibiotic resistance

Hospital-acquired infections in the U.S. have been known to affect more than 700,000 patients in a single year. A new report says some hospitals are combatting this problem by lining surfaces with copper, a practice that has ancient roots. Bacteria resistance, yet, is suspected to be an undermining factor.
The ongoing debate over whether an antibacterial ingredient triclosan should be in soaps seems to have become an issue that's finally settled. It should not be in there and here are three reasons why.
Bad news from the CDC according to the July 23rd issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a quarter of Americans expect an antibiotic prescription when they visit the doctor for a cold. Antibiotics do not fight viral infections like the common cold which is a
Back in May, the British government sponsored a review, headed up by former Goldman Sachs chief economist Jim O'Neill, regarding solutions to the antibiotic resistance crisis. O Neill s final report suggested that we de-link profits fr
It is an understatement to say that antibiotic resistance is a major problem facing our healthcare system. Every year 2 million Americans are infected with resistant bacteria, and at least 23,000 people die each year from these infections. Each year MRSA kills about as many people as HIV. Compounding this problem is the fact that companies (factory farms?) are actively contributing to this problem (
We at ACSH have been writing about the dire situation we face because of antibiotic resistance for years. Both Dr. Josh Bloom and ACSH advisor Dr. David Shlaes a world renowned expert in the field have written many times about the looming antibiotic crisis, a time when common infections that were previously treatable are no longer so
The very touchy issue of whether antibiotic use in livestock (they act as growth promoters) should be banned has come up once again in today s Wall Street Journal. Although research and development in the antibiotic field has come back to life, thanks in no small part to ACSH advisor Dr. David Shlaes, it is not nearly enough to make up for the twenty-year hole in the pipeline caused mainly by a terrible policy change at the FDA.
n April, the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) published a special supplement to their monthly journal that covered the global pandemic of falsified medicine. The supplement included 17 articles that covered a range of topics related to falsified medicine including pieces on
The federal government took another small step in the battle to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. In the same week the WHO released a statement on the growing global crisis of antibiotic
The World Health Organization just issued a statement warning us that the world is failing miserably to adequately fight antibiotic resistance. Although the group does a very fine job in pointing out the consequences of this impending catastrophe, it fails to offer much in the way of a solution.
We at ACSH are fortunate to have amongst our erudite Advisors Dr. David Shlaes, one of the world experts in the fields of both antibiotic research and FDA regulatory policies. Shlaes has been intimately involved with the FDA, which he has both criticized and worked with, trying to prevent us from entering a pre-penicillin age, when there were no effective treatments for bacterial infections.