biotechnology

The New York Times has done something that it very rarely does: It wrote an editorial in support of biotechnology. Unfortunately, the newspaper has a long history of spreading misinformation about GMOs and chemicals, which seriously undermines the important message in its pro-vaccine editorial.
Food labels serve one purpose, and one purpose only: To provide nutritional information to consumers. The process by which a food is produced is not relevant to its nutritional content or safety profile. Therefore, products made using animal cell culture techniques absolutely should not require special labeling.
How profound. This concept, from the preeminent Harvard scientist and noted optimist, is worth examining in the context of biotechnology.
A blog posting on the NYTimes site discusses the Green Revolution in Africa. While gratifying to read about progress being made, some major omissions need to be addressed in this piece, including the lack of Dr. Norman Borlaug s contributions.
Newsweek s recent cover story puts it bluntly: YOU ARE TOTALLY WRONG ABOUT GENETICALLY ALTERED FOOD. And author Tom Parrett eloquently explains why in his article: GMO Scientists Could Save the World From Hunger, If We Let Them.
In his op-ed in Sunday s NYTimes, former anti-GMO activist Mark Lynas explains his conversion to supporting biotechnology as a means of feeding the world s increasing population, many of whom are or are fated to be malnourished without higher crop yields
In his latest slate.com article, ACSH friend and former trustee Dr. Henry Miller, and co-author Kavin Senapathy, criticize television doctor Mehmet Oz for his
Bioengineered crops save lives, so why are so many against it? The CDC has good news on vaccination rates in the U.S., but we're not at 100% yet. More Ebola fears, this time, a community takes it a bit too far.
Last week, Oregon joined the ranks of states trying to pass GMO labeling laws, with the proponents of the bill arguing that consumers have a right to know
FDA is now using cutting edge biotechnology whole genome sequencing to help identify the sources of foodborne illness outbreaks. This technique involves identifying the precise sequence of DNA constituents in a bacterial sample taken from people with an illness, and compares it to samples taken from suspected foods.
Food and You: Feeding The World With Modern Agricultural Biotechnology by American Council on Science and Health
Informative, science-based essay on GMO food products by two experts delivers the goods on the facts of biotech agriculture, in an attempt to counter the myths fomented by agenda-driven anti-technology activists, the fearful and superstitious, and Big Organic.