breast cancer

One of the top trending Google searches at the time of this writing was "asparagine," one of the roughly 20 amino acids that make up the proteins in our bodies and in our food.

Why was this rather boring molecule that biology majors are forced to memorize grabbing international headlines? Because, according to the media, it causes cancer. And where can you find asparagine? It can be found in any food that contains protein -- which is a lot of foods -- including asparagus, the vegetable after which it was named.

Thus, asparagus causes cancer.

Think I'm joking? I'm not. This headline is from The Times of London:

This...

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a well-known phenomenon, which has been plaguing us since right after penicillin was invented. But resistance is not limited to microbes. Human cells can also be or become resistant to the drugs used to treat them. Such is the case with some types of breast cancer cells. Writing in PLOS One, Dr. Gerald Davies from the University of Saskatchewan, in Canada, and colleagues report finding that metformin, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes, has some efficacy in treating drug-resistant breast cancer cells in vitro and in mice.

The authors note that cancer cells may be resistant to a drug or drugs (multiple drug resistant, or MDR) at the beginning...

Women diagnosed with early estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer are typically treated with surgery to remove the tumor and any affected lymph nodes. Then, chemotherapy and estrogen-blocking drugs such as tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors are prescribed. These drugs are usually used for five years, after which they are likely to be halted. But sometimes the tumors recur — sometimes as much as 20 years later — and the question arises as to whether or not they should have remained on the drug treatments and if so, for how long.  However, there can be adverse side effects from longer treatment with tamoxifen or aromatse inhibitors such as  pulmonary embolus or uterine cancer for the former and bone fracture for the latter. Thus, simply advising all women to continue them past the...

Julia Louis-Dreyfus recently announced her breast cancer diagnosis.  This announcement is very timely since  October has been designated as breast cancer awareness month. While it might seem impossible to think that there's anything good about breast cancer, fortunately, there is. 

According to report, which is published every two years by the American Cancer Society, breast cancer deaths have declined by 39 percent between 1989 and 2015. That's about 322,600 fewer victims of the disease. Additionally, between 2006 to 2015, the gap between racial/ethnic disparities seemed to be narrowing (including Alaskan Natives and American Indians).  

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of...

Using a Twitter post, actress of Seinfeld and VEEP fame, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, announced she was recently diagnosed with breast cancer:

     

 

As is included above, the information revealed is quite limited (though this will likely change with time). Breast Cancer comes in many shapes and sizes in terms of tumor type, extent of spread, hormone-sensitivity, aggressiveness and so forth. The treatment options vary depending on these and a host of other factors. The therapeutics involved in...

It's pretty common knowledge that obesity increases the chance that a woman will develop breast cancer, and how her excess adiposity is distributed on her body can be a clue to her risk. A new study from China increases our understanding of one possible mechanism by which this can occur.

First, some words about body shapes. Most men tend to be "apples" in that they carry most of their weight above the waist. Most women, on the other hand, are "pears", carrying more of their weight in the hips and thighs, as shown in the figure above. However, some women are more like apples, and their weight is distributed more like that of men. And if apples and pears become obese, these differences are accentuated. An apple will have a higher ratio of waist to hip circumference than will a...

Fifty or so years ago a woman diagnosed with breast cancer was almost sure to be treated aggressively — with a radical mastectomy. That surgery involved removing, not only the affected breast tissue, but also the underlying muscle and many if not all of the nearby lymph nodes. Not only was that surgery disfiguring, it also caused various morbidities such as lymphedema (1) and difficulty in using the arm. More recently, of course, we have moved on and no longer need to take such draconian measures as often as before — we have a larger armamentarium of systemic treatments (e.g. chemotherapy) and more targeted radiation treatments.

Today, a woman presenting with an early stage breast lesion which has spread to some degree to nearby (sentinel) lymph nodes, could be treated with...

The utility of mammography screening for breast cancer has been a bone of contention, but for some women it has been a life-saver. Indeed, the US Preventive Services Task Force currently recommends that women ages 50-74 should get a mammogram every 2 years. These recommendations are for women who have not been previously diagnosed with the disease, who have no family history or known mutation (e.g BRCA1 or 2) that increases their risk.

The CDC recently reported that the rate for screening tests...

If you read only the headlines this past weekend, your holiday festivities might have been less fun, since the message seemed to be that consuming any amount of alcohol was a certain precursor to developing breast cancer. For example,  the story in the Wall Street Journal catches the eye with its headline "Just One Drink Raises the Risk of Breast Cancer." So that headline will do what it's supposed to — engage the reader and get her to peruse the story itself. But a somewhat different story then emerges — take a look at this quote from the article: "The studies don’t show that alcohol causes breast cancer, but they do show an association or link.”

The...

Actress Shannen Doherty revealed in an Instagram message that she is in remission from breast cancer. In it, she eloquently articulated a very harsh reality for cancer patients about what remission does and does not mean.

As she indicated, the word “remission” does not mean she's in the clear. It is instead a hope that treatment and disease are about to become a closed chapter in the book of her life. She recognizes that before then it means five years of monitoring and surveillance and fluid emotions...