breast cancer

It s hard to believe that anyone can not be aware of breast cancer (BC) these days, when the disease, putative causes and varying types of treatments are constantly the news. It s good to remind people, however, that breast cancer is not fully understood, that there may be more than one type, and that while life expectancy post-treatment has been increasing, there is no certain cure.
The latest in health news: a new cancer drug prolongs life, an FDA-approved device could be key in distinguishing between cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, and why heart attacks may look very different in women
Last year, the advisory committee to the FDA voted to advise approval of a cancer drug, Perjeta, that could be used to treat breast cancer patients before surgery. Now, a new clinical trial sponsored by Swiss drug maker
You may have heard about the speculation that wearing a bra can cause breast cancer. Apparently, the theory behind this absurd scare posits that bras (especially underwire bras) hinder the flow of lymphatic fluids, preventing the removal of waste,
The use of bilateral mastectomy (the removal of both breasts) to treat unilateral breast cancer is becoming increasingly common. In fact, the
Parabens are commonly used in foods and cosmetics as preservatives. Back in 2004, Dr. Philippa Darbre of the University of Reading published a study reporting that many breast cancer tumors contained parabens. This
The latest news on 3D mammography, tobacco use decline, and why not a smartphone app for genetically modified products?
The usefulness and guidelines for screening mammography have been hotly debated for years. Some have questioned whether the technique finds too many lesions that would not progress to threaten a woman s life,
The Harvard School of Public Health in collaboration with the Silent Spring Institute (yes, you guessed it, named after the infamous environmentalist Rachel Carson), just released a list of 102 chemicals as
Cancer meeting reports improvements in survival for men with advanced prostate cancer and young women after breast cancer excision.
f there is one thing you can say about science and medicine it s that it is always changing. Bacterial infections used to be easily treatable. Now antibiotics don t work in many cases. AIDS was a certain death sentence 20 years ago. Now HIV-infected people have life spans that are not too different from non-infected individuals.
Top stories: Mammography guidelines questioned, so-called pediatricians jumping on anti-vaccine bandwagon, and the sour news on Vitamin D, again.