CDC

Due to the endlessly creative ways we inadvertently harm ourselves, health officials felt compelled to step in to reduce unintentional injury.
A well-publicized paper on suicide rates by occupation might have produced faulty data. A re-analysis is underway, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention taking action.
The CDC recently cautioned that there's a wide range of diseases being transmitted by ticks, and the caseload is growing. Some, like Lyme’s disease, we are familiar with. To take it an important step further, let's take a look at some others that aren't necessarily on our radar – but should be. 
Reflections of a recent, unsettling winter event, along with suggestions on how to avoid unintentional injury.
When it comes to infant feeding, recent survey data from the Centers for Disease Control does more to add to the guideline burden than benefit a baby – let alone the parent. 
Before media outlets start scaring you about another infectious disease, learn some important facts.
It’s been an enlightening time in the realm of public defecation. Video of two serial poop-and-run culprits in Colorado and Kentucky – respectively named  “The Mad Pooper” and “Poopman” – have baffled and united many onlookers. But the larger question is: Why is this happening?
E-cigarettes are "effective in helping people quit smoking" and "95% safer than smoking."* Additionally, there are "no health risks to bystanders." What evil, conniving, greedy, Big Tobacco-loving, propaganda-spewing group of shills says that? The UK's National Health Service (NHS).
It's one thing to read countless stories about pain patients being subjected to indescribable suffering, thanks to a thoroughly misguided, foolish CDC attempt to "address" the opioid overdose epidemic. It's quite another to actually speak with one of them, whose story is haunting and profoundly upsetting. 
Recognizing the highly integrated nature of patient sharing between institutions, the Centers for Disease Control rightly aims to make a dent in healthcare-associated infection deaths by using a regional, nuanced approach. Thank you.
Sometimes the CDC really gets it right, and let's give 'em credit! That's certainly true in the case of "chronic" Lyme disease. The agency explains that the symptoms some people suffer after successful Lyme treatment may be due to other tick-borne disease. But the chronic administration of antibiotics isn't necessary to treat a non-existent illness.
Our Dr. Jamie Wells attended a forum yesterday at the Harvard Club of New York. Public Health leaders presented diverse perspectives on how the complex task of preventing healthcare-associated infections needs to be approached.