chemotherapy

In chemo suites all over the country, there are bell-ringing celebrations when a patient's treatment ends. That's nice for the "graduate," but not so much for the terminally ill who are left behind. This is often a cruel and insensitive practice, and it needs to stop.
Complementary medicine ranges from authentic stress-relieving massage to well-meaning (but expensive) placebo, to outright spurious healing claims. Researchers decided to study its impact on patients with curable cancers.
A large study focusing on breast cancer treatment demonstrates that for estrogen responsive, HER2-negative cancers, the majority of women do not require chemotherapy. 
The senior senator from Arizona, diagnosed with brain cancer in July, was hospitalized for "normal side effects of his ongoing cancer therapy." Here's what that means.
A new role for chemotherapy is emerging – and it's not a good one. It's thought that the same drugs used to treat cancer patients may also lead to sepsis with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, resulting in infections that may be lethal.
New research has determined that testicular cancer stem cells are more capable of responding to chemotherapy, and they do so better than stem cells in other forms of cancer. This effectiveness takes place with testicular cancer even after it metastasizes.
Sadly, a woman’s tragic story plays out in the real world more often than people may realize. When treating cancer can, at the same time, harm her baby, the choices can be horrendous.
Given modern medical advances extending survival rates for chronic diseases, while at the same time overall life expectancy continues to lengthen, companies are diving into niche markets. Take, for example, Hormel — makers of Dinty Moore stews and Spam – which has come up with a meal line specifically targeted to cancer patients.
John McCain’s office released a statement from the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix, providing details of his Glioblastoma brain tumor. It was disclosed that the 80-year old senior Senator from Arizona was recovering from a surgical excision of a blood clot performed on July 14 that was discovered during a routine annual physical. 
The fight against cancer has been one tough war. Perhaps the most difficult battle has been finding drugs that selectively kill cancer cells while sparing the rest. A research group at Washington University Medical School has come up with a very clever approach — starving the cancer cells. 
A rare genetic disorder that transforms a person's hands and feet, in particular, into tree-bark-like warts and cutaneous horns made news recently. It's truly out of the ordinary. So what's this all about? 
The concluding piece in this Brain Tumor series spotlights the expertise of Dr. Gregory Riggins. A professor of Neurosurgery and Oncology, and Director of the Brain Cancer Biology and Therapy Research Laboratory at Johns Hopkins, he will help us distinguish myth from reality.