childbirth

The adverse effects on patient safety from poor hospital scheduling and staffing are well known. This occurs when there's a shortage of experienced physicians and health professionals at work during non-standard hours. Maternal health is the latest focus.
Though Hollywood features can be quite dramatic, the real thing can provide much more entertainment.
With women opting for "free birth" or "unassisted birth" the stakes are only getting higher. Dismissing medical advice is also taking the form of a misguided practice of prolonging delivery well beyond due dates.
For some expectant mothers, there's a strong desire to have less "medicalization" of labor and delivery. It manifests itself in home births and water births for those adamantly opposed to a hospital setting. Now, “unassisted birth” goes a step further excluding a trained professional from the delivery. It's time to clarify the risks.
The knowledge of a baby being big or small is just data, not meaningful information. Context is key.
Branding normal phases of development and transitions have become a thing, mainly to sell books more than identify any new discovery. That said, the first three months of a baby’s life after birth and mom’s postpartum period is a rather unique time for many reasons.
With continued refrains of "too many" or "too few" being applied to manners of birth, which often serve to shame or assign blame, the focus is on the wrong issue. A new study on delivery mode helps inform us on this topic.
The U.S. space agency recently launched sperm specimens, from humans and bulls, to the international space station. There, astronauts will conduct experiments on the impact of microgravity on sperm’s motility and function.
After the World Health Organization and United Nations Children's Fund doubled down – urging breastfeeding at all costs, despite no country meeting their standards – we need to ask: Has the U.K.'s latest reversal of the normal birth campaign taught us anything? Value-laden ideology should not drive health policy.
The percentage of women giving birth prematurely in the United States has dropped to 11.4 percent in 2013 - about 450,000 babies - says the March of Dimes premature births report card the lowest percentage in 17 years. About 231,000 fewer babies
Epidurals are the most common method of labor pain relief in the United States. The procedure involves injecting medication near the spinal column to provide continuous pain relief to the lower body. In the past, many health professionals would not administer epidurals until a
Women are now having children later in life, with the average age of first-time mothers rising from 21 years old in the 1970s to 26 years old now. Possibly because older women have a higher rate of