cosmetics

Scientists at MIT have developed a type of "second skin" which behaves similarly to your own epidermis. This material has both cosmetic and medical value, through aesthetic improvements as well as local drug delivery.
An article in yesterday s NYTimes revealed that two U.S.Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Susan Collins (R-ME) are proposing a bill to tighten the FDA s regulatory oversight of the cosmetics
While headlines scream about a link between exposure in the womb to common chemicals and lowered IQs in kids later on, the study these alarms are based upon is just more of the same old junk and data manipulation.
This is what happens when you let your health advice column be taken over by an environmental writer. This week s Science section of the New York Times included an advisory about
A new "study" purporting to show a link between exposure to common class of chemicals phthalates is a travesty of sound science. The article was clearly written with an outcome in mind, and the authors did an excellent job of getting to that outcome by torturing their data, using multiple study chemicals and multiple analytical tools to get their desired "statistical significance." It's still a load of hooey.
Scare-mongering anti-chemical activist groups have pressured the FDA into calling for more stringent oversight of the cosmetics industry. But there is no basis for this concern, and the FDA has many more urgent and important issues on their crowded plate than this nonsense.
It never ends. Having nearly put themselves out of business because of huge improvements in the environment over the last few decades, environmental and consumer safety groups are looking for work.
It s that time of year again. Summer s over, and school is starting again. And with this new year comes another (predictable) chance for activist groups posing as scientific experts to scare parents