death

How often do you hear of someone using their spouse's antibiotic from a prior illness? Or, dispensing an Ambien to a colleague or friend? For those practicing medicine without a license in person, or through social media crowdsourcing, the harms can be considerable.
Whether one is sick or well, the end of life tends to have its own unique story and reaction. There can be sudden deaths of less surprise to us than the final act of an unrelenting terminal disease. But why are we almost always a bit surprised to learn of someone's death?
Kentucky just reported its first flu-related death of the season. With last year’s overall hospitalization rates (among all ages) the highest recorded by the CDC surveillance system, it's time to make things less confusing.
Not unlike government or healthcare metrics, the focus on Sen. McCaskill's injury after she received the life-saving Heimlich maneuver is inherently flawed.
The recent self-death by 104-year old scientist David Goodall brings to the fore a key question: Whether to deem deterioration from advanced aging – beyond having an incurable disease – as another reasonable consideration for euthanasia. 
K2, a dangerous synthetic cannabinoid product – also known as spice, synthetic marijuana, legal weed or fake weed – is wreaking havoc in Illinois and hospitalizing dozens.   In Illinois, synthetic cannabinoids have killed two and hospitalized fifty-six for extreme bleeding. This toll is expected to rise. Believing they are like "pot" or "marijuana" is the public's first mistake.
The weekly report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the dead and dying is morbidly fascinating. In both men and women, heart disease and cancer are #1 and #2 killers, respectively. However, everything changes after that. 
We all have to die. Those of us who process that reality ahead of time might be lucky enough to have a small say over the time and location of our unavoidable demise. And in the process, we may help society as a whole come to terms with death. That is why we applaud the increase in deaths that are occurring at hospices.
Why would someone want to expose themself to serious injury or death just for a few thrill-inducing minutes jumping off a bridge and bouncing around uncontrollably? Yes, we've all heard the catch-all justification: "It's exhilarating -- and it makes me feel alive." Here's a closer look at the health consequences of this edge-of the-envelope activity. On its face it seems quite risky, but how risky is it? Maybe not as much as you think.
What happens when we die? This question is both existential and biological. While scientists cannot address the first, they certainly can address the second. What happens to your body after you die is not pretty. Alas, there is no such thing as death with dignity when the microbial Grim Reaper arrives.
A Phase I clinical trial in France resulted in one death and hospitalization of five other study participants, three of which have irreversible brain damage. Prosecutors there are beginning a manslaughter investigation which will threaten the stability of any future drug trial.
Can you die of a broken heart? A new report says maybe so. Among a group of people who had recently lost a loved one, cardiovascular events increased significantly over the following month.