diabetes

For the very overweight and the obese, gastric bypass surgery has essentially become a game-changer, and in some cases, a life-saver. While the operation has enjoyed this type of widespread success for the very obese, is it also reasonable to use it for those with lesser degrees of obesity? A new, small study says yes.
Bariatric surgery is probably the most effective means of dealing with obesity, and with obesity-linked Type 2 diabetes as well. Some questions remain like, how long do benefits last and who should be eligible for this treatment? A couple of new reports shed some light.
What if a diabetes sufferer, who needs insulin to manage the condition, loses their insurance or can't afford the co-pays. It is possible to buy the drug instead, without a prescription and over the counter, much as one might buy ibuprofen or aspirin? It is, but is this a good idea? It's not clear cut either way.
Bariatric surgery is probably the most successful means of reducing body weight (and fatness) in obese people. But Body Mass Index is not necessarily the best predictor of diabetes remission with the stomach surgery, although it has been the main criterion of eligibility for it.
The holy grail of diabetes research has long been finding a way to administer insulin by mouth. And that goal may have been reached by scientists at the University of California at Santa Barbara, who have developed a capsule that resists the acidic environment of the stomach.
Prospective study of 228 morbidly obese teens shows that two different types of bariatric surgery led to significant benefits. They included weight loss, and improved cardiometabolic levels, including blood pressure, lipids, diabetes and kidney function.
Type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity and increased risk of heart, kidney and eye ailments. And heart attacks are the most common cause of death of those with the disease. But a new study has linked the excess risk of death from any cause to the level of control of blood glucose, as well as to the degree of kidney complications.
Weight-loss surgery has been shown to help control weight and improve metabolic parameters among obese diabetics. This new study, which produced very impressive results, shows the actual degree of improvement of various types of surgery.
Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body fails to produce insulin. But Belgian researchers have come up with a potential solution: reprogramming pancreatic cells to produce insulin and respond to glucose. They announced this week that it's working well in models, with study in humans to hopefully take place.
Experts describe childhood obesity as the canary in the coal mine for chronic diseases. But too many parents are in denial about their children s weight and attitudes vary among different ethnic groups and income levels, among other variables.
A new follow-up study shows that tight blood sugar control for diabetes has little if any benefit on cardiovascular outcomes: stroke or heart attack. So why bother, given the risk of low blood sugar from Rx? There are other reasons.
According to new research published in JAMA, one in three US adults are at risk of heart disease, diabetes, and stroke due to metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is present when someone has three or more of the following conditions: increased blood pressure, elevated blood sugar