diabetes

The knowledge of a baby being big or small is just data, not meaningful information. Context is key.
Diabetes + High Deductibles = Delays in Care A study tries to show that this is true, but the evidence is unconvincing
Self-injury mortality, albeit by suicide or lethal intoxication, spans a continuum that represents two sides of the same coin.
Data mining genomic data is a growing trend. This study seeks to determine whether nature or nurture control who gets ill. Turns out, it's complicated, and genes may not hold all – or any – of the answers.
The allure of evidence-based medicine is that it sounds so objective: free of bias, and free of judgment. But at its core, the evidence-based recommendations from the American College of Physicians are a collective subjective judgment, or a balancing act of tradeoffs. 
Diabetes is a chronic disease and the longer it's present, the more it adversely impacts other body functions. Especially the cardiovascular system. 
The benefits of breastfeeding for a mom include quicker recovery from delivery and, according to a new study, less risk of developing diabetes. Also, both white and black women seemed to benefit, and the longer the duration of lactation the stronger the link.
A recent study published in Annals of Internal Medicine presents a cost analysis of personalized blood sugar goals for diabetic patients. While its numerical conclusions may not be as precise as the figures would make you believe, it does contain some interesting information.
Obesity is known to be a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, as well as for the insulin resistance that's a hallmark of the disease. Mouse studies suggest that obesity results in the production of microRNAs by adipose tissue, which diminishes the ability of tissues to respond to insulin.
Some members of the Old Order of Amish carry a gene mutation that helps them live longer and avoid some of the health problems of aging. Having one copy of the mutation is associated with longer telomeres and less risk of developing diabetes.
People with or recovering from pancreatic diseases may develop a third type of diabetes — diabetes 3c. But a recent English study suggests that clinicians often misdiagnose this condition, and thus might not treat it appropriately.
With the word "cure" we think of it as an end. But, in fact, it's often the end – of a beginning. For those surgically “cured” from cancer, enduring amputation from sepsis or receiving a transplanted organ, the story — though different and uncharted — begins anew.