diabetes

The benefits of breastfeeding for a mom include quicker recovery from delivery and, according to a new study, less risk of developing diabetes. Also, both white and black women seemed to benefit, and the longer the duration of lactation the stronger the link.
A recent study published in Annals of Internal Medicine presents a cost analysis of personalized blood sugar goals for diabetic patients. While its numerical conclusions may not be as precise as the figures would make you believe, it does contain some interesting information.
Obesity is known to be a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, as well as for the insulin resistance that's a hallmark of the disease. Mouse studies suggest that obesity results in the production of microRNAs by adipose tissue, which diminishes the ability of tissues to respond to insulin.
Some members of the Old Order of Amish carry a gene mutation that helps them live longer and avoid some of the health problems of aging. Having one copy of the mutation is associated with longer telomeres and less risk of developing diabetes.
People with or recovering from pancreatic diseases may develop a third type of diabetes — diabetes 3c. But a recent English study suggests that clinicians often misdiagnose this condition, and thus might not treat it appropriately.
With the word "cure" we think of it as an end. But, in fact, it's often the end – of a beginning. For those surgically “cured” from cancer, enduring amputation from sepsis or receiving a transplanted organ, the story — though different and uncharted — begins anew.
We all understand the impact of a gaping wound, or the wasted appearance of a body overrun by cancer. But often there are more silent and invisible conditions that not only invoke a physical furor, but emotional and psychological pain as well. Type 1 Diabetes is such a malady. Thankfully, major advances are ongoing.  
Apparently, you can make any claim with an Asterisk (*), so long as the asterisk clarifies that your claim isn't true. In one of Dr. Oz's latest press releases, the TV 'doc' touts apple cider vinegar (or any vinegar) as a miracle health benefit: it improves blood flow, prevents diabetes, encourages weight loss, and prevents cancer. But not too long ago on the Dr. Oz show, he caveats his claims by saying this: "
Ask yourself this: How often do you think about your ability to hear? Or this: How much would you, or your loved ones, be affected if your hearing was diminished, or lost completely? Not a pretty picture, so learn here how to best protect this incredible gift.  
Recently an important paper — one which had the potential to revolutionize the treatment of type 1 diabetes — was retracted because its results could not be replicated. Far from being a negative incident, this is the way that science should be done.
Erectile Dysfunction (ED) adversely impacts over 30 million men in the United States to some extent.  Depending upon the cause, treatment options can be limited.  Traditionally as a last resort when a man is ineligible or has failed less invasive alternatives, surgical insertion of a penile implant is considered.  Promising technology responsive to heat was recently tested and published.  
A new study published in JAMA details the U.S. county-level trends in mortality rates for major causes of death. While a bit flawed, it's a step in the right direction as regional health disparity is often way more vital to informing policy than national tendencies.