diet

Soda taxes aren't racist, yet precisely that case was made by a reporter for the newspaper. His position: Blacks and Hispanics consume more sugary beverages than whites and Asians, while whites and Asians drink more diet beverages than blacks and Hispanics. Because the tax does not apply to diet beverages, it is racist. Let's break this down.
Food and nutrition companies always capitalize on whatever fad diets are currently in fashion to shamelessly promote their products. Science is usually of secondary concern. Now, Nestlé wants in on the action, promoting an alleged nutritional drink, claiming that it's low in FODMAPs. Huh? What are those?
Outside of the Western world, insect consumption is common. The Chinese, for instance, will eat just about anything that crawls on six (or more) legs. Centipedes and fried scorpions appear on the menu. Not only is entomophagy widespread, it's also probably healthier for people -- and the planet -- than eating other animals.
Too many raisins will kill you, too.
A closer look at food science reveals that a tax on sugary drinks (such as soda, sports drinks, and tea), a policy being pondered by voters in the San Francisco Bay area, is deeply misguided. We get sugar in our diets from many different sources, some of which we would consider "healthy" foods. 
The new Dietary Guidelines for Americans have just been published, and there are some positive moves as well as some of the same-old recommendations that have yet to be shown to be effective. Dietary advice always brings a variety of dissent and assents, so we thought we'd add some of our own.
Every new diet promises amazing results better sleep, weight loss, and overall rejuvenation. But as with most diet fads, even after an initial weight loss, the pounds creep back up. Gluten-free and paleo diets are no exception to this. In fact, unless you have a gluten sensitivity, you are losing valuable nutrients by jumping on the bandwagon. Watch more Friday Fad Day segments here.
This week s U.S. News & World Report features an article by Health and Science Writer K. Aleisha Fetters entitled, Are Health Foods Making You Fat?--experts share how healthy foods can derail your diet. The intentionally misleading title attracts attention, but of course her intent is to warn her readers not to be bamboozled by health claims prominently displayed on food labels, which upon closer inspection turn out not to be so conducive to a healthy diet as it seemed.
Experts describe childhood obesity as the canary in the coal mine for chronic diseases. But too many parents are in denial about their children s weight and attitudes vary among different ethnic groups and income levels, among other variables.
US health officials have long warned that too much salt intake as a child can raise lifelong risk of high blood pressure. However, a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics suggests it s actually potassium intake that kids should be aware of.
Americans trying to lose weight by eating a balanced, low calorie diet often refer to the calorie counts on food packages. But as an article in the New York Times explains, some of these counts could be as much as 25 percent too high.
In an illuminating essay in the New York Times, Dr. A.E. Carroll, professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine, dissects the current tendency to point at one class of nutrients as being the bad one responsible for most of the current diet-related ills.
The latest in health news: long-lasting GM apples win the fight, while GMO labeling adds confusion for consumers, and added vitamins to foods does not make you eat a poor diet, despite what a NYTimes op-ed says.