DNA

A new study reveals that reduced telomere length is associated with childhood trauma in those with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Does this new research make a compelling case for its use in the real, not theoretical, world?
Just like fingerprints, we all have a unique set of behavioral quirks. For example, I tend to drink triple shot, iced vanilla lattes. Before beginning my work, I clean off the table using water and a napkin. (Seriously, why are coffee shop tables always so disgusting?) And, oftentimes, I tip my glasses in a peculiar way as I write my articles. None of these quirks is particularly unique. But taken together, I'm probably the only triple shot, iced vanilla latte-drinking, table-cleaning, glasses-tipping person in Seattle. If I ever committed a crime and the police were out to get me, this combination of quirks may be just enough to identify me.
Testicular cancer has always been different from other cancers in that it can almost always be cured. The reasons for this are now becoming known, but behind it all is good, old-fashioned organic chemistry. 
Ladies, if feeling older than you look appeals to you, take a seat while you read this: A recent study found that women who sit longer than 10 hours a day, combined with low physical activity, have cells that are biologically older — eight years older to be exact — than their actual age. 
It is common knowledge that the information that makes us unique is held in our DNA. But, how does our DNA make our eyes brown - how does it make us who we are? In order to understand that, we have to walk through the journey of how the information held in DNA becomes protein. 
It's a little too soon to celebrate, but scientists in the U.K. may have come up with a new method -- a simple blood test -- that could radically revolutionize the early detection of cancer.
What began as a novel finding in pregnant women may now be a revolutionary breakthrough in oncology. In 1997 researchers in Hong Kong first discovered the presence of small chunks of the growing fetus s DNA circulating in the mother s blood. In eighteen years since its discovery, scientists have developed a way to detect and sequence this
In today s New York Times, 28-year old graduate student Kira Peikoff describes her attempt to determine her risk of several diseases by having her genome analyzed by different companies.