erectile dysfunction

The sudden loss of any body part is life-altering. Yet we live in a time with plentiful options that are continuously advancing, and which can be used to restore a person to a high degree of function. 
Research shows mounting evidence that a man's erectile dysfunction can be linked to higher rates of cardiovascular events.
If someone's lifestyle was represented by the totality of the products advertised during the Super Bowl, the composite picture would be of a sedentary individual with an unhealthy diet, who consumes excessive alcohol and drives everywhere. Do people really live that way? Probably not, but the ads reveal something interesting. 
Erectile Dysfunction (ED) adversely impacts over 30 million men in the United States to some extent.  Depending upon the cause, treatment options can be limited.  Traditionally as a last resort when a man is ineligible or has failed less invasive alternatives, surgical insertion of a penile implant is considered.  Promising technology responsive to heat was recently tested and published.  
The cost of treating erectile dysfunction
Americans take comfort knowing that competition works to keep prices in check, which keeps businesses on their toes while they deliver price-trimming benefits to consumers. However, when it comes to the market for medication that treats erectile dysfunction, that assumption simply and shockingly does not apply.
It isn’t hard to imagine that as our enlarging and ever-stiffening polarized political spheres come to a head, an article about what maintains the penis’ potency might be a kind of crowning glory.
Humans have used some form of condom as a prevention against pregnancy and infection for centuries, and maybe longer. Humans have made condoms out of cloths, animal intestines, oiled silk paper, tortoise shells or animal horn.
You may remember a large study published last year that seemed to find a link between Viagra use and melanoma. The study, from Harvard Medical School Brigham and Women s Hospital, included data on more than 51,000 men aged 40-75, and reported recent use of Viagra (sildenafil) with a near-doubling of the risk of malignant melanoma.
Men: as if erectile dysfunction isn t bad enough, possibly more bad news. There may be a link between ED drugs (Viagra/sildenafil anyway) and the dangerous skin cancer, malignant melanoma. No cause-and-effect shown yet, but the correlation is worrisome.
In the one more thing to worry about category comes a surprise from a multi-center study just published in JAMA, which postulates that the use of sildenafil (Viagra) may increase the risk of malignant melanoma.