food

Outside of the Western world, insect consumption is common. The Chinese, for instance, will eat just about anything that crawls on six (or more) legs. Centipedes and fried scorpions appear on the menu. Not only is entomophagy widespread, it's also probably healthier for people -- and the planet -- than eating other animals.
Supermarket Selections
When it comes to food -- shopping for, eating and disposing of it -- it's surprising how lack of awareness frequently factors into each area. Apparently this was a recurring theme given the tepid news coverage following last weekend's World Food Day, coupled with a recent consumer survey regarding food consumption and waste.
It's nearly impossible to get every last drop of liquid foods out of their containers. Ketchup and syrup are among the worst offenders. Up to 15 percent can be wasted due to such inefficient packaging. But a team of engineers, mostly from Colorado State University, has devised a solution to the world's sticky container problem using a super-hydrophobic material.
Assuming that the company Ava is able to successfully replicate wine by simply combining chemicals in a laboratory, a big question still remains: Would people actually buy it? ACSH President Hank Campbell and Senior Fellow of Biomedical Science Dr. Alex Berezow debate the issue.
The presence of a molecule that strongly enhances the flavor of other molecules may explain why garlic powder is such a commonly used ingredient in cooked foods.
Unlike draping yourself in velvet, which is not socially acceptable, silk remains perfectly fashionable. In fact, it is all the rage at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Tufts University, where a research group led by David Kaplan is literally wrapping silk around everything it can get its hands on.
The millennial generation (born between 1984 and 2004) has its own take on food and nutrition. From eschewing breakfast cereals to checking the web for information, they don't necessarily follow in their predecessors' footsteps when it comes to what they consume.
Students with peanut allergies have forced many schools to ban these nuts. However, scientists are working on a solution: trying to create a peanut without the allergenic proteins. They report they are close to a finished product, but regulatory questions abound as the definition of "GMO" is examined.
The Salk Institute released a study in the journal Cell Metabolism which highlights the erratic behavior of human eating patterns. Researchers did this using a photo app that could have wider implications for diet, weight loss and public health.
We ve taken NYTimes columnist Mark Bittman to task many times for his superficial understanding of the food business, economics, or even common sense. His most recent story is no different: he advocates for weed foraging on city streets as a source of nutritious, organic food in underserved
A new study published in International Journal of Food Contamination shows that pesticide levels in food are far below levels that would warrant health concern.
It s been an issue for as long as scientists sought to quantify what people do and don t eat. How does one get the data? According to Dr. Edward Archer of the University of Alabama, Birmingham and colleagues, the current data have been based on inaccurate methodologies that make most of these