GMO

Question: Does the deletion a gene make an organism genetically modified? Answer: Not if the organism is a plant – only if it's an animal. The contradictions of that definition are now a subject of congressional concern.
CRISPR-Cas9, unlike other methods, can create food products so close to the original that they are not considered genetically-modified organisms. That's because it's not how the process of change is of regulatory concern, but instead, it's the final result. Biosimilar is not genetically modified. 
Reputations are funny – they take years to build but seconds to destroy. Cargill, a company that provides all manner of agricultural products and services, ruined its reputation with farmers and science writers by announcing a partnership with the thoroughly wretched Non-GMO Project, an anti-biotech organization.
We were recently contacted by a concerned group of pro-science scholars who wants to counter the unscientific arguments made by anti-GMO activist Vandana Shiva. We made this handy flyer for them. Then, we realized that this could be useful for anybody who needs to confront the anti-GMOers in their lives. So, here it is. Feel free to print and distribute as widely as possible! 
When ACSH's Alex Berezow was the editor of RealClearScience, he frequently linked to Pacific Standard's content. However, in recent months, he says the magazine as a whole has now become nearly unreadable. As its political cheerleading becomes more and more blatant, its standards for science journalism have fallen -- and that's no coincidence.
One of the latest contributions from the Huffington Post to the national dialogue comes courtesy of self-described teenage "food safety activist" Rachel Parent, who skyrocketed to fame after giving an anti-GMO talk for Tedx, and debating Kevin O'Leary. Her new article is titled "GMO Propaganda Has No Place In Your Child's Classroom." She then goes on to regurgitate her own propaganda.
Despite the common notion among Americans that Europe is a progressive, technologically advanced utopia, the reality is that the continent -- when it comes to matters of science -- is rather backward. Now, a very harsh report in the most recent issue of Trends in Biotechnology underscores the infuriating extent of the problem.
Researchers have been able to identify a gene that determines maleness in mosquitoes, and if that were introduced into females it could potentially help wipe out the vector for the Zika virus infection. This method could also be applied to fighting other diseases such as yellow fever, Dengue and Chikungunya.
It'd be hard, if not impossible, to avoid eating genetically modified foods. By one means or another virtually all our crops grains, fruits and vegetables have been modified in this fashion. If you don't believe it, take a look at the earlier versions of some of our current foods.
The FDA has approved another GM animal. But unlike AquaBounty's GM salmon OK'd less than a month ago, nobody will be eating this one. These modified chickens will produce a drug in their egg whites, which can then be isolated and then administered to patients suffering from a rare genetic condition.
Organic food purveyors point out that organic already is non-GMO, while a non-GMO food is not necessarily organic. For the rest of us, it s basically a tempest in a teapot, except the teapot is the source of a huge amount of dough.
It's ironic that folks who are hot for supposedly "natural" health promotors, such as resveratrol and genistein, may have to opt for the GMO variety if they want to avoid man-made compounds.