GMO

Despite the common notion among Americans that Europe is a progressive, technologically advanced utopia, the reality is that the continent -- when it comes to matters of science -- is rather backward. Now, a very harsh report in the most recent issue of Trends in Biotechnology underscores the infuriating extent of the problem.
Researchers at Penn State University have engineered a mushroom that doesn't brown using CRISPR/Cas9, a straightforward, inexpensive and effective technique that can be used to alter the DNA of almost any organism in which it's been tried. This mushroom is just the first in what will be a long list of genetic modifications in organisms (both food and humans) created using this technology.
Researchers have been able to identify a gene that determines maleness in mosquitoes, and if that were introduced into females it could potentially help wipe out the vector for the Zika virus infection. This method could also be applied to fighting other diseases such as yellow fever, Dengue and Chikungunya.
It'd be hard, if not impossible, to avoid eating genetically modified foods. By one means or another virtually all our crops grains, fruits and vegetables have been modified in this fashion. If you don't believe it, take a look at the earlier versions of some of our current foods.
The FDA has approved another GM animal. But unlike AquaBounty's GM salmon OK'd less than a month ago, nobody will be eating this one. These modified chickens will produce a drug in their egg whites, which can then be isolated and then administered to patients suffering from a rare genetic condition.
Organic food purveyors point out that organic already is non-GMO, while a non-GMO food is not necessarily organic. For the rest of us, it s basically a tempest in a teapot, except the teapot is the source of a huge amount of dough.
It's ironic that folks who are hot for supposedly "natural" health promotors, such as resveratrol and genistein, may have to opt for the GMO variety if they want to avoid man-made compounds.
Lovers of french fries, rejoice: the new, non-bruising potato has hit the market. The Idaho spud joins a list of GM products designed to appeal to the consumer. But will people put their GM taters (and bucks) where their mouths are? Read more.
It's OK to eat bacterial proteins sprayed on organic crops, but dangerous to have the plants produce the same proteins, or so say the off-balanced, anti-GMO activists. But as an article in the Washington Post points out, that stance has less support than a two-legged stool.
How can we those committed to science and rely on empirical data convert those who are religiously opposed to genetically modified crops despite an overwhelming consensus among independent sciences and global science?
Bt Brinjal (eggplant) is a genetically modified plant which is created by inserting a gene from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis into the genome of the brinjal. The Bt brinjal has been developed to have resistance against lepidopteron insects. It was approved for
On Thursday, the US House of Representatives passed the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2015 a bill that would ban states from requiring labels for all genetically modified foods. The bill passed by a vote of 275 to 150.