hypertension

A large study from Japan shows no significant protective effect of low-dose aspirin against cardiovascular mortality among people with risk factors (but no prior CVD history). Now what should doctors advise?
The National Center for Health Statistics released their annual report on mortality last week, and not so surprisingly, they found that the life expectancy in 2012 for older adults has continued to increase. Currently, a 65 year old will live on an average an additional 19.3 years: about 18 years for men and almost 21 years for
The benefits of bariatric surgery for weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes have been studied extensively. However, questions remain as
A new advisory from a Federal panel finds strong evidence that low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of preeclampsia in women at risk of this worrisome pregnancy-related condition. Of course, this recommendation should be individualized for patients.
Hypertension is well-known to be a major risk factor for all types of cardiovascular disease: stroke and heart attack. Now a study seems to show that mid-life HT may also predict cognitive decline later on.
Monitoring blood pressure at home is more reliable than occasionally checking in at the doctor s office and it saves both time and money, and helps prevent disastrous cardiovascular events.
Many different drugs are available to help lower blood pressure, and lifestyle changes can also be important in controlling HTN. One important question is how low the target blood pressure should be or how low should it go?
The American Journal of Hypertension released new findings supporting that fact that the current sodium intake in the general
Controlling blood pressure is key to reducing the risk of another stroke in hypertensives who ve already had one. But only one-third of post-stroke victims have good BP control: this is unacceptable.
A new study assessed the risk of fall-related injuries in almost 5,000 older people with high blood pressure in relation to the medication they were taking. There was some trend toward greater risk of falling among those being treated.
A new study shows that high blood pressure (HBP) is being inadequately treated among those with primary care physicians, and the level of control is worst among those
A special joint panel of the Stroke and Heart Associations issued gender-focused guidelines on reducing the toll of strokes among women. In their vast literature review, surprising focus is on younger women.