hypertension

In most people's minds, high blood pressure is undoubtedly linked to salt intake. But there's another mineral that should also be considered — potassium. A recent review of several types of studies strongly indicates that it's not just a proper sodium level that helps one achieve, and maintain, normal blood pressure.
Vital signs matter. And they matter most when they're collected correctly and they provide accurate data. Dismiss them, or do them incorrectly, and the erroneous information will likely result in harmful medical decisions made on your behalf.
It isn’t hard to imagine that as our enlarging and ever-stiffening polarized political spheres come to a head, an article about what maintains the penis’ potency might be a kind of crowning glory.
The prevalence of dementia in the United States significantly declined from 11.6 percent in 2000 to 8.8 percent in 2012. The consequence of this impacts retirement, families, the health care system, life expectancy, morbidity and mortality, pensions, housing, transportation and countless societal realms. 
Researchers from Boston report that eating white potatoes, even as potato chips, are linked to developing high blood pressure (the increased risk is small). But we question whether anyone should change their diets because of studies like this that show only associations, not causation.
High blood pressure frequently accompanies obesity and can lead to a myriad of ills, such as kidney problems, heart disease and stroke. A new study demonstrates that is also true for children and teens, and underscores the importance of achieving and maintaining a healthy body weight.
Women with relatively severe PMS may be at higher risk of developing high blood pressure (HBP), or hypertension. It's not clear how such an interaction may occur. Premenstrual syndrome sufferers may be at especially high risk of developing HBP before age 40. Thiamine and riboflavin may reduce the increased risk.
Continuing declines in overall U.S. death rates between 1969 and 2013 represent major public health gains, including in most specific illnesses. COPD death rate is higher than it was initially, but is also now declining along with smoking rates.
Yes, if you have hypertension (HTN, or high blood pressure), your risk of cardiovascular ills heart attack or stroke is increased.
A new series of articles by the NYTimes Gina Kolata focuses on improvements in dealing with emergency cardiac events, and indeed the progress has been remarkable. But that s not the solution to reducing the toll of our nation s leading killer: coronary disease.
Despite an increase in awareness and public health efforts, the diabetes epidemic in America persists. The CDC estimates 21 million Americans were living with diabetes as of 2010 with 1.5 million new cases being diagnosed each year
High blood pressure, or hypertension (HTN), is one of the leading risk factors for stroke, and there are many drugs available to help control this problem. However, researchers continue to investigate further means to lower the chances of hypertensive patients having a stroke, which is often a devastating (or fatal) event.