influenza

Like a headache, pneumonia is a symptom or condition. Specifically, it's lung inflammation and it can be lethal. Lacking further information, simply having pneumonia provides no clue as to its underlying cause. Pneumonia can be the result of infection with bacteria, viruses or fungi. Which means there's no such thing as a "pneumonia vaccine."
Each year the recommended childhood and adolescent vaccine schedules are reviewed, adjusted and approved. The 2017 revisions are now available, and here are some of the recent changes affecting everyone from infants to those up to the age.   
With winter approaching, perhaps you or somebody you know will be unlucky enough to catch a nasty "stomach flu" or "24-hour flu," (which will produce some quality time in the bathroom). Now while you will almost certainly feel better within 24-72 hours, here's the catch: There's no such thing as the stomach or 24-hour flu.
Flu Season Ahead
This Saturday marks the beginning of flu season -- which spans the months of October to May -- so that means it's time to get your flu shot. The ideal time is to get vaccinated before the end of October. The CDC has issued immunization guidance with a few changes worth noting, which we have for you here.  
Flu vaccine given by nasal spray is a godsend to parents of kids who fear "shots." But for the next flu season they may well have to revert to the injectable version, since experts fear the spray is not very effective against the most prevalent strains of the inluenza virus.
Young babies can't get flu shots, since their immune systems aren't mature yet. But pregnant mothers can get protected, and then pass their immunity to their babies. A new report shows that infants whose moms had been vaccinated had a 70 percent reduction in flu infection. There's really no reason not to do it. 
A New York state court judge's ruling, revoking New York City's mandatory flu vaccination for pre-school and young school children, is a counterproductive public health move. Hopefully the state legislature can revise the law to allow the city to require such vaccinations, to protect its youngest kids.
The seasonal nature of the flu shot, as well as misinformation about its perceived toxins, have damaged the vaccine's public image and contributed to its perceived ineffectiveness. But as researchers attempt to come up with a long-lasting universal flu vaccine, a new study may have an answer as to why we are failing to develop it.
A recent Boston Globe article about flu vaccinations raised the notion that those who receive a flu shot every year to have less protection than those who get it less frequently. What does science make of this? It's hard to say. But we say that some protection is better than none at all.
An updated report from the CDC said that as of February 28th, influenza activity continued to decrease, but remained at elevated across the United States. Their latest report showed that flu activity has been at elevated levels for 15 consecutive weeks. The average length of a flu season is 13 weeks. This
While viral contagions spread across the nation like wildfire, stubborn pockets of anti-vaccine resistance promote their spread and expose all of us vaccinated or not to needless danger.
The latest in health news: anti-vaxxers stand by their beliefs while measles breaks in Disney and a new study confirms their safety, antiviral drugs may be the alternative to the failed flu shots but not all experts agree, and in the court of public opinion, fear-mongers win the debate over gmo and pesticide safety.