Johnson & Johnson

Scientists say that talcum baby powder doesn't cause cancer. Trial lawyers say it does. As usual, the lawyers win. Scientists, common sense, and Americans lose.
American science and industry are under threat by this complex, known to be an unholy alliance of activists and trial lawyers who deploy various pseudoscientific tricks to score multibillion-dollar lawsuits against large companies. No industry is safe from these deceptions.
Oklahoma now has 572 million extra dollars, thanks to a judge's ruling that Johnson & Johnson was partly responsible for the so-called opioid crisis. Other states will follow and J&J will cough up a bunch of money, regardless of whether the company did anything wrong or not. Other companies will be hit as well. Meanwhile, ponder these questions: Why would any company sell opioids from now on? And what will this mean for you?
The Missouri Court of Appeals reversed a jury's decision that awarded $72 million to a plaintiff who claimed Johnson & Johnson's talcum powder products caused her ovarian cancer. But the court's ruling was based on a jurisdictional issue, not the lack of scientific evidence underpinning her claim.
Here is ACSH's official list of this year's top 10 scares