junk science

It seems the world and his wife will sacrifice everything that's nice to eat in the pursuit of health and slimness. At least until the boredom kicks in. “Keto” is the latest craze. So what’s the low down on this super-restrictive diet, where carbs are the enemy and fat is king?
A new video released by the magazine attempts to explain why there are more obese Americans today than 30-40 years ago. It claims that even if people eat healthy and exercise, it's easier to be obese today because of three factors -- but only one of those is likely to be correct.
Facebook plans to crack down on content that peddles fake health news and other snake oil. While this is a great idea in theory if done properly, FB's track record of policing the content of its social media platform is poor. Their officials should seek outside help. May we suggest the American Council on Science and Health?
Get this: 5G activists say that wireless technology causes cancer; cardiovascular disease; DNA damage; learning and memory deficits; impaired sperm function and quality; miscarriage; neurological damage; obesity; diabetes; as well as autism; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); and asthma in children. That's a pretty scary list. A nuclear bomb can't even do all that.
We aren't the sort of organization that likes to say "We told you so." (Okay, that was a lie. We totally are.) Secular doomsday prophet Paul Ehrlich has been proven wrong (again), and ACSH has been proven correct (again).
Older people often take many supplements, including ones purported to help with brain health. A recent study says the supplements do not work.
Too many journalists are experts in nothing and behave like partisans and activists. That's how a journalist can go on social media and celebrate that her poor reporting caused a company to lose hundreds of millions in market capitalization.
The New York Times ran an Op-Ed about the wellness industry that asked, "Why are so many smart women falling for its harmful, pseudoscientific claims?" Gee, maybe it's because they also read about the benefits of witchcraft in the very same newspaper?
The benefit? You might just be getting better at the game you’re practicing.
A couple of years ago Panera Bread went crazy. Those high up in the corporation decided that selling really great tasting food was no longer a sufficient strategy. No, they reasoned, if Panera Bread wanted continued success it needed to go on a full-frontal assault against science. 
The New York Times recently swallowed whole a study which concluded that those who eat meat die 23% more quickly than those who don't. But the meat study sounded fishy. And it was. ACSH advisor and expert biostatistician Dr. Stan Young turns the meat study into hamburger.
The maker of Keto Breads, allegedly "the world's healthiest bread," claims that all the other bread out there causes autoimmune disease and leaky gut syndrome. The former claim is risible and the latter is "not a recognized medical diagnosis."