New York Times

Dr. Henry Miller, a former FDA deputy commissioner, used to be a big fan of the New York Times' coverage of science and medicine. But no longer. He takes issue with an editorial that accuses the agency of reducing its scrutiny of new drugs. Dr. Miller explains why the Times is off-base: the development of precision medicine.
The editorial board of the New York Times came out in favor of revising FDA regulations of cosmetic products. This is a reasonable suggestion since such a review has not taken place since 1938. But sound science, especially toxicology, is essential for any change in regulations to be meaningful. Unfortunately, on the science itself, the newspaper's proposal misses the mark.
The New York Times objectively reports on how the news media, politicians and science were wrong about "crack baby" epidemic. But they never apologize to their readers or accept responsibility.
It was discovered that Ali Watkins, the newspaper's national security reporter, slept with a source who was an aide to the Senate Intelligence Committee. That source has now been arrested as part of an investigation into leaks of classified information. A breakdown in journalistic ethics, to say the least.
Veteran New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof fancies himself an expert in chemistry and toxicology. Chemists and toxicologists disagree.
From telecommunications and transportation to healthcare and entertainment, cutting-edge technology serves society well. But not when it comes to food. Oh no. We don't want technology anywhere near that. Neanderthal know-how is perfectly fine, thanks. What's behind that bizarre thinking?
This "disease" is a somewhat tongue-in-cheek – though still quite real – phenomenon. Often, those who have been awarded a Nobel gain infamy for saying and believing incredibly stupid things, some of which are quite delusional. Mr. Krugman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist and columnist, is the newest inductee into this dubious club.
Here we go again. The NYTimes columnist Nick Kristof has wandered away from his saving the world s underprivileged bailiwick to once again scare-mong about toxic chemicals, this time in popcorn and that s not the only dangerous item! No siree.
There are many ailments that a physician can easily diagnose and health officials can track. For example, the cause of an infection can usually be determined by the presence of an infectious pathogen. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes is easy to establish. The same can be said for asthma, strep throat, or
In yesterday s New York Times Well Column, Jane E. Brody discusses memory and cognitive aging solutions and the science (or lack thereof) behind them. There are a variety of these remedies and devices currently on the
A Columbia faculty Chair and even Oprah seem to be distancing themselves from Dr. Oz. It s about time, given both his unprofessional demeanor and potentially harmful medical advice on his TV show, and his attempt to distract attention from his own malfeasance.
Dr. Josh Bloom in Science 2.0, March 22, 2015 Let s give a big shoutout to Gawker . They really stuck it to the Times by pointing out that their columnist Nick Bilton, who writes about technology, business,