pesticide

EWG warns the public about pesticide residues on produce, and tell people to buy organic instead. What they leave out is all of the organic pesticides, some even sprayed on the day food gets on the truck.
The language of science has been hijacked. Those who are looking to make a quick buck (or in the case of the organic industry, 43 billion bucks) have no qualms about twisting the definition of highly precise scientific terminology to suit their own profit-driven agendas. Here's a brief glossary of the some of the most commonly misused scientific terms. (Note: the health food and fad diet industries are among the biggest abusers.)
Terminix, one of the largest pesticide companies in the world, agreed to pay $10 million in a case where a family of four became critically ill by exposure to methyl bromide, a very toxic pesticide that's banned in the United States.
A blog posting on the NYTimes site discusses the Green Revolution in Africa. While gratifying to read about progress being made, some major omissions need to be addressed in this piece, including the lack of Dr. Norman Borlaug s contributions.
The latest in health news: anti-vaxxers stand by their beliefs while measles breaks in Disney and a new study confirms their safety, antiviral drugs may be the alternative to the failed flu shots but not all experts agree, and in the court of public opinion, fear-mongers win the debate over gmo and pesticide safety.
Can DDT fight the bedbug problem? Maybe. But the banned insecticide could do a lot more than that IF science held sway rather than mythology and superstition.
Will wonders never cease? Strident toxic atrazine mythologizer Tyrone Hayes of UC-Berkeley finds no evidence of amphibian effects from the common, safe and effective herbicide.
Hank Campbell of Science 2.0 points out the vast gulf between journalism and pandering in an irresponsible way merely to get attention, whatever the cost to sound science and public health. Same concern applies to phony research targeting chemicals.